Category Archives: history

Return to Homesteading – Ten Reasons People Are Becoming More Self Reliant-Live and Work The Pioneer Way

Return to Homesteading – Ten Reasons People Are Becoming More Self Reliant-Live and Work The Pioneer Way

Tired of the rat race, fast food and feeling out of touch with your world? These days people are becoming more self reliant, depending on themselves for what they eat, what they wear and even how they light their homes and run their appliances. Here are ten reasons why people return to homesteading.

1.Inflation A year go at our local supermarket, a bargain loaf of bread cost about a dollar. Today, that same loaf of bread costs almost twice as much. As the dollar decreases in value and the cost of food increases, more people are turning to growing a garden, raising chickens and even keeping goats for food, eggs, meat, milk and cheese.

2.The Economy The recent loan crisis, the recession and the housing market have a lot of people concerned. Many believe there is a very real possibility of another great depression. During the last depression, those who had their own land and a big garden were able to avoid the soup lines and starvation. A return to homesteading is insurance against possible tough times ahead.

3.Disaster Insurance Likewise in the face of disaster, it’s wise to be self-reliant and to be able to produce or have on hand sufficient food, water and even energy. Few cities have more than a few days worth of food on hand. Should we face a terrorist attack or another natural disaster like Katrina, self-reliance is a good way to be prepared.

4.Foodborne illnesses Salmonella in our peanut butter, e coli on our lettuce and tomatoes and even beef, and poison in our pet food. People these days are growing more concerned about what is going into their food – and looking for ways to prepare that food themselves instead.

5.Chemicals in Food Even when they don’t have salmonella or e coli, most of the food we buy is processed, loaded with chemicals such as MSG and preservatives. When we return to homesteading, we begin eating simple, whole foods that truly nourish our bodies.

6.Concern For The Environment Homesteading is a saner, more balanced approach to food production. With organic gardening, you don’t just take from the earth; you also give back by composting. Many homesteaders also use solar and wind energy to power their homes – clean, cheap and safe for the environment.

7.Pesticides By growing organically, we not only eliminate dangerous pesticides from our food, we also eliminate it from our patch of land, cleaning up the earth one small patch at a time.

8.Health Benefits Homesteading involves chores outside and lots of fresh air and exercise. We raise our own food, which means we have a more whole and natural diet that strengthens our bodies.

9.A Yearning For Simplicity Modern society is fast-paced, complex and exhausting. Most people are too busy earning that four-car garage to actually enjoy anything. Many return to homesteading for the slower pace and the chance to actually enjoy life.

10.Reconnect With Family When we weed the garden or feed the chickens, we can get the children involved to help. We can turn to our parents and grandparents for advice on how to pluck a chicken or grow tomatoes. Homesteading connects us to family in a unique and powerful way that an office job never will.

How to Live like a Pioneer-Learn more about history and science Living Like a Pioneer

Source:http://pioneerthinking.com 

Pass The Dessert : The Best 10 Old Fashioned Thanksgiving Recipes From Turkey to Dessert

Pass The Dessert : The Best 10 Old Fashioned Thanksgiving Recipes From Turkey to Dessert

1.SPINACH, PEAR AND GREEN BEAN SALAD WITH RIESLING DRESSING

INGREDIENTS

  • 1/2 cup diced peeled cored ripe Bartlett pear
  • 6 tablespoons medium-dry Riesling
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon chopped shallot
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/2 pound haricots verts or small green beans, trimmed
  • 6 cups (packed) baby spinach leaves (about 6 ounces)
  • 3 ripe Bartlett pears, quartered, cored, cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices
  • 3/4 cup crumbled blue cheese
  • 3/4 cup walnuts, toasted

PREPARATION

Purée diced pear, Riesling, lemon juice, shallot and Dijon mustard in food processor until smooth. With machine still running, gradually add vegetable oil through feed tube and blend mixture until smooth. Transfer to bowl. Season dressing to taste with salt and pepper.

Cook green beans in large pot of boiling salted water until just tender but still firm to bite. Drain well. Transfer beans to medium bowl filled with ice water and cool thoroughly. Drain well. (Dressing and beans can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover separately and refrigerate.)

Toss green beans, spinach and sliced pears in large bowl with enough Riesling dressing to coat. Divide salad among plates. Sprinkle with crumbled blue cheese and toasted walnuts.

2.ROAST TURKEY WITH BACON, TARRAGON AND APPLEJACK GRAVY

INGREDIENTS

  • For turkey:
  • 1 10-ounce jar crabapple jelly
  • 3/4 cup plus 6 tablespoons (2 1/4 sticks) butter
  • 1/3 cup frozen apple juice concentrate, thawed
  • 4 tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon
  • 12 ounces mushrooms, quartered
  • 1 large onion, coarsely chopped
  • 1 large carrot, coarsely chopped
  • 1 22- to 24-pound turkey, neck cut into 4 pieces
  • 10 cups (about) canned low-salt chicken broth
  • For gravy
  • 1/4 cup all purpose flour
  • 3 cups (about) canned low-salt chicken broth
  • 8 bacon slices, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon
  • 1/4 cup applejack or other apple brandy (optional)

PREPARATION

Make turkey:
Stir jelly, 1/2 cup butter, apple juice concentrate and 2 tablespoons tarragon in small saucepan over medium heat until butter and jelly melt. Remove glaze from heat. (Can be made 2 days ahead. Cover and chill. Bring to room temperature and rewhisk before using.)
Set rack at lowest position in oven and preheat to 375°F. Place small rack in center of large roasting pan. Melt 1/4 cup butter in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. Add mushrooms, onion and carrot; saut
 until dark brown, about 12 minutes. Sprinkle vegetables and turkey neck pieces around rack in pan.

Stir remaining 6 tablespoons butter and 2 tablespoons tarragon in heavy small saucepan until butter melts. Rinse turkey inside and out; pat dry with paper towels. Place turkey on rack in pan. Starting at neck end, slide hand between skin and breast meat to loosen skin. Brush 3 tablespoons tarragon butter over breast meat under skin. If stuffing turkey, spoon stuffing loosely into main cavity. Brush remaining tarragon butter over outside of turkey. Sprinkle turkey with salt and pepper.

Tuck wing tips under turkey; tie legs together to hold shape.
Roast turkey 45 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350°F; add 1 cup broth to pan. Cover turkey loosely with foil. Roast until thermometer inserted into thickest part of thigh registers 180°F., adding 1 cup broth and basting with pan juices every 1/2 hour and brushing with 1/3 cup glaze twice during last 2 hours, about 4 1/4 hours longer if unstuffed or 4 3/4 hours longer if stuffed.
Transfer turkey to platter. Tent with foil; let stand 1/2 hour. Reserve pan juices.

Make gravy:
Mix 1/2 cup glaze and flour in small bowl to blend. Strain pan juices into large measuring cup, pressing on solids; spoon off fat. Add enough broth to measure 6 cups.
Sauté bacon in heavy large saucepan over medium heat until crisp. Pour off fat. Add broth mixture to saucepan and bring to boil. Whisk in glaze-flour mixture and tarragon, then applejack. Simmer until thickened to sauce, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.


The Lost Ways…a true story about our grandparents days!

Once Upon a Time in AmericaAre you ready to turn back the clocks to the 1800s for up to three years?Our grandfathers and great-grandfathers were the last generation to practice the basic things that we call survival skills now. ….Watch this video and you will find many interesting things!

 

3.LEEK, MUSHROOM AND BACON STUFFING WITH TARRAGON

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 24-ounce loaf sliced buttermilk bread, crust trimmed, bread cut into 1/2-inch cubes (about 11 cups)
  • 1 pound bacon slices, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 7 cups chopped leeks (white and pale green parts only)
  • 1 1/2 pounds button mushrooms, coarsely chopped
  • 12 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stemmed, caps coarsely chopped
  • 4 cups coarsely chopped celery
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon or 1 1/2 tablespoons dried
  • 2 large eggs, beaten to blend
  • Canned low-salt chicken broth

PREPARATION

Preheat oven to 350°F. Spread bread cubes on 2 rimmed baking sheets. Bake until bread is almost dry, about 15 minutes. Cool. Transfer to large bowl.
Sauté bacon in large pot over medium-high heat until crisp, about 12 minutes. Transfer bacon to paper towels to drain. Reserve 6 tablespoons drippings in pot; discard any remaining drippings.
Add leeks and button mushrooms to same pot. Sauté over medium-high heat until beginning to soften, about 5 minutes. Add shiitake mushrooms and saute 4 minutes. Add celery and sauté until leeks and mushrooms are tender but celery is still slightly crisp, about 6 minutes longer. (Bread, bacon and sautéed vegetables can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover separately. Store bread at room temperature; refrigerate bacon and vegetables.) Mix bacon, sautéed vegetables and tarragon into bread. Season generously with salt and pepper. Mix eggs into stuffing.

To bake stuffing in turkey:
Loosely fill main cavity with stuffing. Add enough broth to remaining stuffing to moisten lightly (about 1/4 to 1/2 cup, depending on amount of remaining stuffing). Generously butter glass baking dish. Spoon remaining stuffing into prepared dish. Cover with buttered foil, buttered side down. Bake stuffing in dish alongside turkey until heated through, about 25 to 30 minutes. Uncover and bake until top is slightly crisp and golden, about 15 to 20 minutes.

To bake all of stuffing in baking dish:
Preheat oven to 350°F. Generously butter 15 x 10 x 2-inch . Add enough broth to stuffing to moisten (about 3/4 to 1 cup). Transfer stuffing to prepared dish. Cover with butter foil, buttered side down; bake until heated through, about 30 to 35 minutes. Uncover and bake until top is slightly crisp and golden, about 20 to 25 minutes longer.

4.MASHED POTATOES WITH RUTABAGAS AND BUTTERMILK

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 1/2 pounds rutabagas, peeled, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 3 pounds russet potatoes, peeled, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) butter
  • 3/4 cup (or more) buttermilk
  • Chopped green onion tops or chives

PREPARATION

Cook rutabagas in large pot of boiling salted water until very tender, about 20 minutes. Using slotted spoon, transfer rutabagas to strainer. Press gently to release any excess liquid.
Add potatoes to same pot of boiling water; cook until tender, about 20 minutes. Drain well. Return potatoes and rutabagas to same pot. Add butter; mash well. Add 3/4 cup buttermilk; mash until smooth. Season with salt and pepper. (Can be made 6 hours ahead. Cover and chill. Stir over low heat to rewarm, adding more buttermilk by tablespoonfuls, if desired.)
Transfer potatoes to bowl. Sprinkle with green onions and serve.

5.PEAS WITH CARAWAY, BLACK PEPPER AND PARMESAN BUTTER

 

INGREDIENTS

  • 7 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan cheese (about 1 1/2 ounces)
  • 6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) butter, room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon caraway seeds
  • 3/4 teaspoon grated lemon peel
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • 3/4 cup chopped shallots
  • 3 10-ounce packages frozen petite peas, unthawed
  • 1/3 cup canned beef broth or water
  • 1/3 cup chopped fresh Italian parsley

PREPARATION

Mix Parmesan cheese, 4 tablespoons butter, caraway seeds, lemon peel and pepper in small bowl. (Can be prepared 3 days ahead. Cover and refrigerate.) Melt remaining 2 tablespoons butter in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. Add shallots; sauté until tender, about 3 minutes. Add peas, broth and parsley and stir until peas are heated through, about 8 minutes. Add Parmesan butter and stir until melted. Season with salt. Transfer to bowl and serve.

6.CHILI CORNMEAL MUFFINS

INGREDIENTS

  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter
  • 1 cup frozen corn kernels, thawed
  • 4 teaspoons chili powder
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 cup yellow cornmeal
  • 1 cup all purpose flour
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda

PREPARATION

Preheat oven to 400°F. Butter twelve 1/3-cup metal muffin cups. Melt butter in heavy medium skillet over medium heat. Add corn and chili powder. Sauté 3 minutes. Transfer to medium bowl. Mix in buttermilk, then eggs. Cool completely.
Whisk cornmeal, flour, sugar, baking powder, salt and baking soda in large bowl to blend. Add buttermilk mixture; stir just until blended.
Divide batter among prepared muffin cups. Bake until tester inserted into center of muffins comes out clean, about 20 minutes. Transfer muffins to rack. Cool slightly. (Can be made 2 weeks ahead. Cool completely. Wrap in foil, seal in plastic bag and freeze. Rewarm muffins wrapped in foil in 350°F oven until heated through, about 8 minutes.)

7.CRANBERRY SAUCE WITH DRIED CHERRIES AND CLOVES

INGREDIENTS

  • 21/2 cups cherry cider or black cherry cider or cranberry juice cocktail
  • 1 8-ounce package dried tart cherries (about 2 cups)
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 12-ounce package cranberries
  • 1/4 teaspoon (generous) ground cloves

PREPARATION

Bring cider to simmer in heavy, large saucepan. Remove from heat. Add cherries and let stand 8 minutes. Mix in sugar, then cranberries and cloves. Cook over medium-high heat until cranberries burst, stirring occasionally, about 9 minutes. Refrigerate until cold, about 4 hours (sauce will thicken as it cools). (Can be prepared 4 days ahead. Cover and keep refrigerated.)

8.ORANGE AND SPICE PUMPKIN PIE

INGREDIENTS

For crust

  • 1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) chilled unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 large egg yolk
  • 3 tablespoons (or more) ice water
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons grated orange peel

For filling

  • 1 15-ounce can solid pack pumpkin
  • 3 large eggs
  • 3/4 cup (packed) golden brown sugar
  • 3/4 cup whipping cream
  • 1/4 cup frozen orange juice concentrate, thawed
  • 1/4 cup crème fraîche or sour cream
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Lightly sweetened whipped cream
Fine strips of orange peel (optional)

PREPARATION

Make crust:
Blend flour, butter, sugar and salt in processor until mixture resembles coarse meal. Add yolk, 3 tablespoons ice water and orange peel. Process until moist clumps form, adding more water by teaspoonfuls if dough is dry. Gather dough into ball; flatten into disk. Wrap in plastic; chill 1 hour. (Can be made 2 days ahead. Keep refrigerated. Let soften slightly at room temperature before rolling out.)
Position rack in bottom third of oven and preheat to 400°F. Roll out dough on lightly floured surface to 14-inch round. Transfer to 9-inch glass pie dish. Trim overhang to 3/4 inch; fold under and press into 1/2-inch-high standing rim. Using scissors, make diagonal cuts in dough rim at 1/2-inch intervals; press cut rim pieces alternately in and out. Pierce crust (not dough rim) all over with fork.

Freeze crust 30 minutes.
Line crust with foil; fill with dried beans or pie weights. Bake until crust edge is dry and set, about 12 minutes. Remove foil and beans. Bake crust until lightly colored, pressing with back of fork if crust bubbles, about 8 minutes. Transfer crust to rack and cool completely. Reduce oven temperature to 325°F.

Make filling:
Whisk first 10 ingredients in large bowl until well blended. Pour into prepared crust.
Gently cover crust edge with foil to prevent over-browning. Bake until filling puffs and begins to split at edges and is just set in center, about 1 hour 5 minutes. Cool pie on rack. (Can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate.)
Top pie with whipped cream and orange peel strips, if desired. Serve cold or at room temperature.

9.APPLE CRISPS WITH DRIED CHERRIES AND GINGER

 

INGREDIENTS

For topping

  • 1 1/4 cups old-fashioned or quick oats
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons (packed) dark brown sugar
  • 3/4 cup all purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 3/4 cup almonds, lightly toasted, chopped
  • 1/2 cup chopped crystallized ginger

For Filling

  • 4 pounds Granny Smith or Pippin apples, peeled, cored, sliced
  • 1 1/2 cups dried tart cherries
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon all purpose flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • Vanilla ice cream

PREPARATION

Make topping:
Mix oats, brown sugar, flour, cinnamon and salt in large bowl. Add butter and rub in until coarse crumbs form. Mix in almonds and ginger. (Topping can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover and refrigerate.)
Make filling:
Preheat oven to 375°F. Butter twelve 1 1/4-cup soufflé dishes. Combine apples, cherries, sugar, lemon juice, flour and ground cinnamon in large bowl. Mix to blend well. Divide filling among prepared dishes.
Sprinkle topping over apples. Bake until topping is golden brown, about 40 minutes. Serve warm with ice cream.

10.OLD-FASHIONED MINCEMEAT PIES

INGREDIENTS

Filling:

  • 1 pound venison or lean beef, boiled and chopped
  • 4 ounces suet
  • 1 pound tart apples, peeled, cored, and chopped fine
  • 3/4 cup beef broth (or reserved cooking liquid from meat)
  • 1 1/4 cup sugar
  • 3/4 cup cider
  • 1/4 cup molasses
  • 2 tablespoons cider vinegar
  • 1 cup golden raisins
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground allspice
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground nutmeg
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
  • Juice from one lemon
  • Juice from one orange
  • 1/4 cup brandy

Pie:

Pastry dough for 9-inch double-crust pie
1 large egg white, lightly beaten
Makes a dozen mini pies

PREPARATION

For the filling: In large stock pot or Dutch oven, combine all ingredients except brandy and bring to boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 2 hours, stirring occasionally. Add brandy and cool to room temperature.
For the pies: Place oven rack in middle position and heat oven to 375 degrees.
Roll dough to 1/8-inch thickness and cut into 12 4-inch circles and 12 2-inch circles.
Line standard capacity muffin tin with larger circles, pressing dough firmly into pan edges; chill for 30 minutes if dough becomes soft.
Fill each cup to the top with about 1/3 cup mincemeat, top with smaller dough circles, then cut a slit or small circle in the center of each. Brush with egg white and bake until dough is golden brown and filling is bubbling, about 30 minutes.
Cool on wire rack 15 minutes, remove pies from pan, and continue to cool another 30 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature.


This Pioneering Grandma is Building These Tiny Sustainable Homes Out of Hemp

This Pioneering Grandma is Building These Tiny Sustainable Homes Out of Hemp

Hemp is the only plant that can feed you, house you, clothe you and heal you.

The DEA considers hemp to be a dangerous substance and it’s still classified as a schedule I drug, alongside heroin and ecstasy, even though the plant contains almost no THC and has no psychoactive effects. Many believe this classification is the result of the oil industry’s grip on the legislative process in America, because hemp is one of the most viable alternatives to plastics, fuel and other building materials, in fact, it used to be an important domestically produced crop, and it even contains extraordinary health benefits.

There seems to be a common setback for people afraid to make their dreams become a reality: They don’t know where to start. Not having experience in something doesn’t make you any less capable of creating greatness or fulfilling your passions, but it does take an open mind, a whole lot of patience, and ultimately, the confidence that you can do it.

In a world where old age seems to work against people’s confidence in you, Pam Bosch shows having confidence in yourself is all it really takes to prove them wrong. The grandmother from Bellingham, Washington, has never built a home before, but is breaking barriers in the tiny home movement through what she views as a pioneering experiment in sustainable living.

Her organization, called Highland Hemp House, used imported hemp from Europe to construct tiny homes boasting model energy and resource efficiency.

“Anybody can do this. Grandma can do this. Grandma’s doing it,” the 62-year-old artist says. Bosch was determined to build homes out of hemp after learning about its incredible sustainability and the minimal impact it has on the planet compared to other building materials.

“We should have as many buildings as we can that are built out of a renewable resource that sequesters carbon, that is healthy and if it were legal would be very affordable. It’s an agricultural waste product we’re using,” she continued.

Hemp is considered a dangerous substance by the DEA and is classified a schedule I drug, like heroin and ecstasy, despite the plant containing almost no THC and having zero psychoactive effects. The classification is thought by many to be backed by the oil industry, which sees hemp as a profitable threat, thanks to it being one of the best alternatives to plastics, fuel, and various building materials.

Hemp is also valuable to farmers, who can use it for soil remediation, plastic composites, organic body care, biofuels, and health foods. In Washington, hemp is now legal for livestock feed, but requires permission from the DEA until other uses are legalized and regulated.

For building a tiny hemp home, Bosch says it’s great for creating the plaster, so long as weather conditions are right. “You want conditions like we’re starting to see now – overcast, high humidity, because you don’t want it to dry out too fast,” she notes.

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Because permits for hemp houses don’t exist, Bosch has to stay within 120 square feet. “I’m investing in this because I believe in it and believe someone’s got to do it to make it legal,” she says.

Human impact on the planet continues to change our environment, making it essential that we become more conscious of how and with what materials we build things.

Tiny homes contribute to the awareness that we can thrive in smaller spaces while also creating a sustainable future.

Check out the video below to see how Bolsch is becoming a pioneer in the tiny home movement, and proves that anyone can do it.

Have You Ever Heard About Hempcrete?

 

When it comes to new and sustainable housing ideas, it seems to always be about creating a more efficient home in terms of insulation, lighting, electricity, etc. Mainstream belief  on the subject would have you believe that top corporations and government projects are working with the best possible technology to bring forth solutions that work and are going to be great for the environment. If that was truly the case, I can guarantee you that the whole world would be using Hempcrete right now. Haven’t heard of it? I’m not too surprised.

First off, what is Hempcrete? Hempcrete is a building material that incorporates hemp into its mixture. Hempcrete is very versatile as it can be used for wall insulation, flooring, walls, roofing and more. It’s fire-proof, water-proof, and rot-proof as long as it’s above ground. Hempcrete is made from the shiv or inside stem of the hemp plant and is then mixed with a lime base binder to create the building material. This mixture creates a negative carbon footprint for those who are concerned with the carbon side of things. Hempcrete is much more versatile, easy to work with and pliable than concrete. In fact, earthquakes cannot crack these structures as they are 3 times more resistant than regular concrete.

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Since lime is the binding material, builders do not have to heat up the lime as much as a supplier would need to in the industrial creation of concrete. This results in a lot of energy conservation when producing Hempcrete vs. concrete. Jumping back to the carbon aspect, Hempcrete sequesters (hides or puts away) carbon as it is very high in cellulose. Through it’s growing life cycle, it takes in large amounts of carbon which is then built into the home or building it is being used to construct. This does not allow the carbon to be released into the atmosphere. A home can save about 20,000lbs of carbon when being built out of Hempcrete

Hempcrete is a much more superior building material due to the fact that it is a very strong, lightweight and breathable material. When used as exterior walls, it lets water in without rotting or damaging the material. In a practical sense, instead of needing to build homes with space between exterior walls, which are then filled with insulation, you can simply use a Hempcrete wall. As humidity is taken in from the external environment, the Hempcrete holds that humidity until it is ready to be released again when the climate is less humid. Since the lime is wrapped in cellulose, the lime takes a bit longer for it to fully  petrify but is still incredibly strong. Over time, the lime looks to turn back to a rock, so the material becomes harder and harder until it petrifies completely. This means the wall will last thousands of years vs. 40 – 100 like normal building materials today.  Another great aspect to Hempcrete is that if too much is mixed during building, you can return it to the soil as a great fertilizer. Since hemp grows to maturity in just 14 weeks, it is a very powerful, versatile, cheap and sustainable solution.

Other notable factors are that hemp requires no fertilizer, weed killer pesticide or fungicide to grow it. The hemp seed can be harvested as a nutritious food rich in Omega-3 oil, amino acids, protein and fiber. It is considered a “super food”. The outer fibers can be used for clothes, paper and numerous every day items. This truly is a very powerful plant and should be a no brainer when it comes to it being used in a very mainstream way.


Why seniors are flocking  to medical marijuana??

Imagining your grandmother smoking a joint might make you giggle. But the reality is that many senior citizens are discovering the medical powers of marijuana.

The Lost Ways…a true story about our grandparents days!

The Lost Ways prepares you to deal with worst-case scenarios with the minimum amount of resources just like our forefathers lived their lives, totally independent from electricity, cars, or modern technology whatsoever, which means you’ll also be bulletproof against the ever-increasing threat of an Electro Magnetic Pulse, a Powerful Economic Breakdown, Famines, Wars, and Natural Disasters,Epidemics and Disease . You’ll have the power to protect and save your family…even to rebuild your community during the worst times.watch this FREE video!

Why Is Hemp Illegal? 

Hemp looks very much like marijuana and is technically in the same family of plants. But unlike modern maryjane, it does not contain anywhere near the amount of THC needed for someone to get high if they were to smoke it. The funny thing is, in the United States, hemp is just as illegal to grow as marijuana is. But how can this be? If we can’t get high from it, then what’s the problem?

In the past, hemp was used for many things: clothes, cars, plastics, building materials, rope, paper, linens, food, medicine and so on. In fact, it used to be mandatory in the United States for farmers to grow hemp if they had the land. You can find out even more about hemp here.

The fact is, hemp was very popular throughout the 1800s and 1900s because it was incredibly useful and easy to grow, and its derived products were so long lasting. But one day that all changed; it became illegal and so did its friend cannabis (marijuana). How did this happen?

The History

During Hoover’s presidency, Andrew Mellon became Hoover’s Secretary of the Treasury and Dupont’s primary investor. He appointed his future nephew-in-law, Harry J. Anslinger, to head the Federal Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs.

Secret meetings were held by these financial tycoons. Hemp was declared dangerous and a threat to their billion dollar enterprises. For their dynasties to remain intact, hemp had to go. This then led them to take an obscure Mexican slang word – ‘marihuana’ – and push it into the consciousness of America. The reason why they changed the name was because everyone knew of hemp and how amazing it was for the world. They would never be able to get away with banning hemp, so they used a name they knew no one would recognize. 

Not long after this plan was set in place, the media began a blitz of ‘yellow journalism’ in the late 1920s and 1930s. Yellow journalism is essentially journalism where stories with catchy headlines are put into the mainstream media to get attention, yet these stories are not well researched or backed up. They are often used simply to sway public opinion. Many newspapers were pumping stories emphasizing the horrors and dangers of marihuana. The “menace” of marihuana made headlines everywhere. Readers learned that it was responsible for everything from car accidents to looser morals, and it wasn’t long before public opinion started to shape.

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Next came several films like Reefer Madness (1936), Marihuana: Assassin of Youth (1935) andMarihuana: The Devil’s Weed (1936), which were all propaganda films designed by these industrialists to create an enemy out of marihuana. Reefer Madness was possibly the most interesting of the films, as it depicted a man going crazy from smoking marijuana and then murdering his family with an axe. With all of these films, the goal was to gain public support so that anti-marihuana laws could be passed without objection.

Have a look at the following regarding marihuana from The Burning Question, aka Reefer Madness:

  • A violent narcotic
  • Acts of shocking violence
  • Incurable insanity
  • Soul-destroying effects
  • Under the influence of the drug he killed his entire family with an axe
  • More vicious, more deadly even than these soul-destroying drugs (heroin, cocaine), is the menace of marihuana!

Unlike most films with a simple ending, Reefer Madness ended with bold words on the screen: TELL YOUR CHILDREN.

In the 1930s, things were different from today in significant ways. The population did not question authority or the media to the extent that we do now, and they did not have tools like the Internet to quickly spread information and learn about things that were happening. Most built their opinions and beliefs off of the news via print, radio, or cinema. As a result (and thanks to the explicit instruction of mainstream news), many people did tell their children about marihuana. Thus, public opinion about this plant was formed.

On April 14, 1937, the Prohibitive Marihuana Tax Law, the bill that outlawed hemp, was directly brought to the House Committee on Ways and Means. Simply put, this committee is the only one that could introduce a bill to the House floor without it being debated by other committees. At the time, the Chairman of the Ways and Means was Robert Doughton, who was a Dupont supporter. With vested interest, he insured that the bill would pass in Congress.

In an attempt to prevent the bill from being passed, Dr. James Woodward, a physician and attorney, attempted to testify on behalf of the American Medical Association. He mentioned that the reason the AMA had not denounced the Marihuana Tax Law sooner was that the Association had just discovered that marihuana was hemp (or at least a strain of it).

Hemp and marijuana are both varieties of Cannabis sativa, but this distinction was purposefully obscured from the public. Since the law was not focused on banning one or the other, both found their way into the ban. The AMA recognized cannabis/marihuana as a medicine found in numerous healing products sold that had been used for quite some time. The AMA, like many others, did not realize that the deadly menace they had been reading about in the media was in fact hemp.

In September of 1937, hemp prohibition began. What was arguably the most useful plant known to man at the time, at least in the West, became illegal to grow and use: cannabis (marijuana) and hemp, one used to give a bad name to the other, even though neither should have realistically garnered that negative backlash. To this day, this plant is still illegal to grow in the United States.

READ MORE:

Road to Prohibition: Why Did America Make Marijuana Illegal in the First Place?BECAUSE BILLIONAIRES WANT TO REMAIN BILLIONAIRES!


To the public, Congress banned hemp and cannabis because it was said to be a violent and dangerous drug. In reality, hemp does nothing more than act as an amazing resource to virtually any industry and any product, and cannabis is and can be a useful medical substance that, when administered correctly, can have many benefits. But it should also be mentioned that cannabis has been abused over the years and does have its negative side effects. This is a reality many in the community don’t want to admit but it has to be said. We know the effects it has on regular users under 25 years old as well as what heavy regular use can do to serotonin levels. 

Fast forward to today, and it is clear we are in some trouble when it comes to how we treat our environment. The resources and practices we use today for energy, as well as product creation, are very harmful and toxic to not just our planet but ourselves. Despite the awareness that exists about hemp as an option to transform how things can be done on this planet, governments continue to ban this plant, and it is still often mistaken for marihuana due to their similar appearance.

Luckily, much more cultural and regulatory progress is being made on the side of cannabis to not only illustrate the value of it medically, but also to better understand its potential dangers. This helps to work out the difference between fact and fiction so we can use the plant responsibly while taking advantage of its benefits.

Sources:

https://www.mcgill.ca/newsroom/channels/news/study-cannabis-double-edged-sword 27677 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kCxg1sVYbV4

http://www.hempfarm.org/Papers/Hemp_Facts.html

http://www.hempcar.org/hempfacts.shtml

http://www.collective-evolution.com

How To Make The Perfect Hay Bale Gardening For Spring-Step By Step-Hay Bale Gardening Effortless Food Production with No Weeds, No Fertilizer & Less Watering

How To Make The Perfect Hay Bale Gardening For Spring-Step By Step-Hay Bale Gardening Effortless Food Production with No Weeds, No Fertilizer & Less Watering

We have decided to do Hay Bale gardening this year in Louisiana. This video shows us getting everything set up and the conditioning process started. No more worries about the yard flooding. The Hay Bale Garden series begins….

Hay bale gardening is probably the most fun you’ll have growing your own food and herbs, requiring almost no work or maintenance.

After a search online to find the simplest and easiest “no work” gardening method, I stumbled upon straw bale gardening. The concept is simple: You plant directly into bales of straw, and as the season progresses, the straw is broken down into virgin soil that nourishes the plants from inside the bale. One amazing benefit of this method of gardening is that the bales provide a raised bed, which keeps predators away and makes picking your vegetal treasures at the end of the season easy on the back. I watched every video I could find on the subject, and have since concluded that using HAY bales instead of STRAW bales is far superior.

Why Hay Bales are Superior to Straw Bales?

Before we get into why hay bales are superior to straw bales, let’s first define what they are:
Straw bales are basically stalks of plants, usually corn, that have been dried out and baled together into various shapes and sizes.
Hay bales are grasses that have been dried and baled together.

In my research, the idea that hay bales may have seeds in them and could grow weeds is the same reasoning reiterated time and time again by proponents of straw bale gardening. The reason why this idea holds little water is that when nitrogen is added to feed the bacteria and fungi to start the decomposition process of the bale, a process called “Conditioning your bale”, the interior of the bale can reach temperatures as high as 130 degrees Fahrenheit or more.

The likelihood of seeds surviving these extreme temperatures is slim, and a number of other benefits that come from using hay bales make it a far superior approach in my opinion.

-Straw is likely made from genetically modified plant matter – The problem with straw bales is that they will usually be made of genetically modified corn or soy. Do you really want your food growing in decomposing genetically modified plant matter?


RECOMMENDED:

There is an old saying that our great-grandparents used to know:

Once in life you need a doctor, a lawyer, a policeman, and a preacher, but every day, three times a day, you need a FARMER.”

The Lost Ways…. A True Story About Our Grandparents Days!

They got things done or else we wouldn’t be here!Watch this video and you will find many interesting things!Watch this FREE Video


-No fertilizer needed with hay – Hay is made of dried grasses, and for its ability to convert sunlight and soil minerals into dense nutrition, it has been said that grass is the healthiest plant on the planet. When we use hay bales for gardening (as opposed to straw bales), the compost that is formed within the bale to feed the plants is far superior in nutrition and, unlike straw bales, no fertilizer needs to be added to feed your plants throughout the season.

Less Watering – Straw holds water less effectively than hay, so instead of watering once per day with hay bales, you might have to do it 2 or 3 times per day.I like your concept

How to Grow a Hay Bale Garden

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The first step to growing a hay bale garden is to acquire your hay bales. Take a look on your local classifieds like Kijiji or Craigslist and find a local farmer who is selling them. Once you find a nearby farmer with 40lb hay bales for sale, email them and arrange a time to pick them up or have them delivered to you.

Once you have the bales and have arranged them in your yard, the next step is to “condition” your bales. Buy yourself some 42-0-0 fertilizer, or some urea (nitrogen), and from here you will be introducing nitrogen into the bales over a 10-day period that will have the fungi, bacteria and insects breaking down your bales into fresh, virgin compost to feed your plants. You can also pee on your bales, as it is high in nitrogen and minerals, so start saving up pee in bottles for a fertilizer cost savings of about $40.

Days 1,3,5,7,9 – Add 1/2 cup of nitrogen to your bales and spray them with water so the nitrogen will soak in.
Days 2,4,6,8,10 – Soak the bale with water only.

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During the conditioning process, the temperature of the bale will rise significantly, from my research, up to 140 degrees Fahrenheit. In fact, the bales will become so hot that it’s important to keep the bales wet to eliminate the risk of a fire. Although risk of fire is minimal, keep this in mind when deciding where to stage your bales. When the conditioning process is complete, you’ll know it because the temperature inside the bale will have come back down from hot to warm. Now you’re ready to plant!

Simply plant your vegetable seeds or germinated seeds into the bale, water them once a day and you’re on your way to healthy produce in a few exciting months. The best part is, at the end of the season you’ll have yourself a heap of fresh compost that you can further compost or add to your other gardens or perennial plant beds for nourishment.


DIY Home Energy System–Learn how to produce off-grid power-How to Slash Your Power Bill by up to 75% (or more) in less than 30 days – Guaranteed!

See the video below for more information on how to get started:

Once Upon a Time in America…Are you ready to turn back the clocks to the 1800s for up to three years?Our grandfathers and great-grandfathers were the last generation to practice the basic things that we call survival skills now. …

How North American Indians and Early Pioneers Made Pemmican?Watch the video below!

By,Mark David  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tF_FvSQTL6M

3 comments

  1. Monti 24 August, 2017 at 15:29 Reply

    Title includes the text “No Fertilizer”.

    Article text
    “-No fertilizer needed with hay –
    no fertilizer needs to be added

    next step is to “condition” your bales. Buy yourself some 42-0-0 FERTILIZER ”

    Fail

COLUMBUS DAY OR GENOCIDE DAY? LET’S CELEBRATE GENOCIDE! [HISTORICAL EVIDENCE,PHOTO,VIDEO]

COLUMBUS DAY OR GENOCIDE DAY? LET’S CELEBRATE GENOCIDE! [HISTORICAL EVIDENCE,PHOTO,VIDEO]

Columbus Day is a U.S. holiday that commemorates the landing of Christopher Columbus in the New World on October 12, 1492. It was unofficially celebrated in a number of cities and states as early as the 18th century but did not become a federal holiday until the 1937. For many, the holiday is a way of both honoring Columbus’ achievements and celebrating Italian-American heritage. Throughout its history, Columbus Day and the man who inspired it have generated controversy, and many alternatives to the holiday have appeared in recent years.

Why do we celebrate Columbus Day?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=absDgsmPIXY&ab;_channel=CBSNews


ORIGINS OF COLUMBUS DAY

The first Columbus Day celebration took place in 1792, when New York’s Columbian Order–better known as Tammany Hall–held an event to commemorate the historic landing’s 300th anniversary. Taking pride in Columbus’ birthplace and faith, Italian and Catholic communities in various parts of the country began organizing annual religious ceremonies and parades in his honor.

In 1892, President Benjamin Harrison issued a proclamation encouraging Americans to mark the 400th anniversary of Columbus’ voyage with patriotic festivities, writing, “On that day let the people, so far as possible, cease from toil and devote themselves to such exercises as may best express honor to the discoverer and their appreciation of the great achievements of the four completed centuries of American life.”

COLUMBUS DAY ALTERNATIVES

Kevin CostnerChristopher Columbus Arrival 500 Nations Native 


The Truth About Columbus Day: Why Are We Celebrating?

Christopher Columbus was the ISIS of his day.

He justified rape, murder and pillage with religion and funded his efforts with whatever he could steal.Today, while millions across America are celebrating Columbus Day, the city of Seattle is celebrating Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

That’s because last year, the Seattle city council unanimously passed a resolution to honor the contributions and cultures of Native Americans on the second Monday of October.While Seattle’s decision may seem unusual, it’s actually part of growing trend.Many cities and states across the country have shifted away from celebrating Columbus Day, and that’s because more and more Americans are learning the real history behind Christopher Columbus and his “discovery.”


The REAL History Of Christopher Columbus

First of all, Columbus didn’t actually discover the Americas, despite what you may have been taught in elementary school.Thanks to archaeological evidence, we know now that there were many other groups who traveled to the Americas long before Columbus did.For example, back in the 10th century, the Vikings had settlements in what are now Greenland and Newfoundland.And DNA evidence proves that Polynesians came to South America almost a century before Columbus sailed the ocean blue.

So, Columbus’ “discovery” of the Americas wasn’t really a discovery at all.

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But enough about the discovery. Let’s talk about the man himself, and what he did to the indigenous peoples that he found when he arrived in the New World.

When Columbus set sail in 1492, he was on the hunt for gold to bring back to Europe, and eventually landed on an island known as Hispaniola, which today is the home of the Dominican Republic and Haiti.

Unfortunately, Columbus didn’t discover much gold on Hispaniola, but he did find something as good as it, if not better: people.And Columbus thought that the indigenous people that he discovered would make great slaves.When Columbus discovered the Taino indigenous peoples of Hispaniola, he wrote back to the Spanish monarchs funding his voyage, saying that.


“They are well-built, with good bodies and handsome features…They do not bear arms, and do not know them, for I showed them a sword, they took it by the edge and cut themselves out of ignorance. They have no iron. Their spears are made of cane…They would make fine servants…With fifty men we could subjugate them all and make them do whatever we want. Here there are so many of these slaves…although they are living things they are as good as gold…”Over time, Columbus’ real actions in the Americas have been replaced by a warm-and-fuzzy coloring book story of a bold and brave explorer who set out to discover a new world.

But in reality, as we have learned from writings of Christopher Columbus’ own men, the “bold explorer” raped, pillaged, enslaved and slaughtered people just to get rich.One of Columbus’ crewmen, Miguel Cuneo, wrote about the scene when Columbus arrived in Hispaniola for the second time, and thousands of Tainos, or what were referred to as Indians, came out to greet Columbus’ ships.

Cuneo wrote,

“When our caravels…were to leave for Spain, we gathered…one thousand six hundred male and female persons of those Indians…For those who remained, we let it be known [to the Spaniards] in the vicinity that anyone who wanted to take some of them could do so, to the amount desired, which was done.”

Cuneo also wrote that he took his own sex slave, a beautiful young girl, who in his own words, “resisted with all her strength,” leaving him with no choice but to, “thrash her mercilessly and rape her.”

Columbus eventually started up a global child-sex-slave trade, shipping off Indians to all corners of the globe.

He even bragged about it to a friend in a letter written in 1500, saying that, “A hundred castellanoes (a Spanish coin) are as easily obtained for a woman as for a farm, and it is very general and there are plenty of dealers who go about looking for girls; those from nine to ten (years old) are now in demand.

Under Columbus’ rule, life for the Taino people became so bad that they resorted to mass suicide.Twenty-five years after Columbus had arrived in Hispaniola, the Spanish missionary Pedro Cordoba wrote that,

“As a result of the suffering and hard labor they endured, the Indians choose and have chosen suicide. Occasionally a hundred have committed mass suicide. The women, exhausted by labor, have shunned conception and childbirth. Many, when pregnant, have taken something to abort and have aborted. Others after delivery have killed their children with their own hands, so as not to leave them in such oppressive slavery.”

Eventually, Columbus resorted to wiping out the Taino altogether.

Prior to Columbus’ arrival in the New World, scholars place the population of Haiti/Hispaniola at around 1.5 to 3 million people.

By 1496, it was down to 1.1 million, according to a census done by Bartholomew Columbus, Columbus’ brother.

By 1516, the indigenous population was at 12,000, and by 1542, fewer than 200 natives were alive on Hispaniola.

By 1555, every single native was dead. Every last one.

If Columbus was robbing, raping and pillaging Hispaniola today, we would probably be bombing him from the air.

It’s time to put the shameful history of Columbus and his enslavement and murder of Native Americans behind us – and start celebrating the indigenous peoples who called the Americas home long before Columbus ever set sail. 

Tribute of Native Americans – Honneur aux Amerindien


The Lost Ways…a true story about our grandparents days!

Once Upon a Time in America…Are you ready to turn back the clocks to the 1800s for up to three years?

Our grandfathers and great-grandfathers were the last generation to practice the basic things that we call survival skills now. ….Watch this video and you will find many interesting things!

loost (1)


By,Ptricia Irons-NewsPrepper

Source:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BmqmdunscMM&ab_channel=StaffwebAY...https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=absDgsmPIXY&ab_channel=CBSNews….https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aF_unlvjccA&ab_channel=BadCrayfishProductionshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o51LPfrjsqQ&ab_channel=NicanTlacaUniversity..https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=yR210z1qSKw&ab_channel=LiliBernard

1 comment

  1. 26 October, 2018 at 09:16 Reply

    I do not write well, but I have to translate it into a Google Translator.

    When Koreans hear the Cherokee Indian national anthem, they can understand it to a certain extent.
    At least I can tell that this song is Korean. (I wonder if some American singers know what it means to sing this song.) The Cherokee Indian prophecy says that their brothers will come to the west and save themselves.
    (A couple of years ago, a special envoy for North Korea ‘s Illuminator went to the US … or sooner or later more brothers will go to the United States.)
    I wish for the peaceful resolution of the problem between North Korea and the United States.
    I am told that Americans and s-Koreans could suffer a great deal of damage.)

    I heard that the British American Jews slaughtered the ancestors of Korea and brought Koreans to the peninsula. Perhaps the Cherokee Indians are of the same lineage as our Koreans.
    The first day that Japan merged Korea, it burned a lot of books.
    But I could not hide everything.
    According to the data of modern Joseon(Korea) Dynasty, the land of Joseon was recorded as 2880 mile in east and west 10080 mile in north and south.
    Today, not only in America but also in South America, our culture is being discovered more and more and many people are putting it on the Internet personally.
    With the advent of the Internet, many truths are being revealed.
    Some even claim that the palace of Joseon was in Seattle.
    I heard there is a huge underground tunnel in the Grand Canyon and there is a huge Buddhist statue.
    There are also many books.
    The US government will have no choice but to hide it.
    This is because they have no choice but to reveal how they have occupied America.

    When I was young I grew up listening to Columbus’ discoveries of the Americas.
    I also enjoyed watching the Indian massacre.
    However, after decades of being grown up, I realized that the Indians were my ancestors.
    And when you look at the pictures and pictures of wars when the British American Jews occupy the Americas, they are certainly not Indians or savages.
    At some point it was manipulated by the fact that only Indians live in the Americas.

    In any case, I would like to express my respect to you who have correctly assessed your ancestor Columbus.
    You are obviously conscience, moral, and true.
    I deserve respect.

    The United States is Babylon. The end of Babylon is approaching.
    I wish you all to cope with the danger.

As We Approach Thanksgiving, It Is Wise To Recall What Almost Killed the Pilgrims: Communism! And What Saved Them: The Free Market System of Capitalism.

As We Approach Thanksgiving, It Is Wise To Recall What Almost Killed the Pilgrims: Communism! And What Saved Them: The Free Market System of Capitalism.

Recalling the story of the Pilgrims is a Thanksgiving tradition, but do you know the real story behind their triumph over hunger and poverty at Plymouth Colony nearly four centuries ago? Their salvation stemmed not so much from the charitable gestures of local Indians, but from their courageous decision to embrace the free-market principle of private property ownership a century and a half before Adam Smith wrote The Wealth of Nations.

Writing in his diary of the dire economic straits and self-destructive behavior that consumed his fellow Puritans shortly after their arrival, Governor William Bradford painted a picture of destitute settlers selling their clothes and bed coverings for food while others “became servants to the Indians,” cutting wood and fetching water in exchange for “a capful of corn.” The most desperate among them starved, with Bradford recounting how one settler, in gathering shellfish along the shore, “was so weak … he stuck fast in the mud and was found dead in the place.”

The colony’s leaders identified the source of their problem as a particularly vile form of what Bradford called “communism.” Property in Plymouth Colony, he observed, was communally owned and cultivated. This system (“taking away of property and bringing [it] into a commonwealth”) bred “confusion and discontent” and “retarded much employment that would have been to [the settlers’] benefit and comfort.”

THE PILGRIMS’ SHORT LIVED EXPERIMENT IN COMMUNISM

Many have credited Karl Marx with inventing what we now know as communism in the middle of the 19th century. The concept of communal living and dependence, however, came long before The Communist Manifesto. Over the centuries, the concept has been applied by different people in different places. While the reasons for applying the communal approach varied as widely as the people who attempted it, one thing did remain constant: failure. From Roman latifundiae to the Soviet Union, communism time and again proved the failure inherent in its concept. Americans do not need to look to distant lands and little known peoples for evidence of the failure of communism. They simply need to look back at one of the most celebrated groups of people in their history: the Pilgrims.

As most educated Americans know, Puritan Separatists, or Pilgrims, landed in Massachusetts in 1620. What many don’t realize is that the original economic system of their colony, Plymouth Plantation, was a form of communism. There was neither private property nor division of labor. Food was grown for the town and distributed equally amongst all. The women who washed clothes and dressed meat did so for everyone and not just for their own families. This sounds like the perfect agrarian utopia envisioned by Marx and Lenin. What happened to it? To find the answer to that question, one must turn to Of Plymouth Plantation by William Bradford. Bradford served as Governor of Plymouth Colony from 1620 to 1647 and chronicled in great detail everything that happened in the colony.

By 1623, it was obvious the colony was barely producing enough corn to keep everyone alive. Fresh supplies from England were few and far between. Without some major change, the colony would face famine again. In his chronicle, Bradford described what was going wrong and how it was solved (pardon the King James English):

The Lost Ways…a true story about our grandparents days!

Once Upon a Time in AmericaAre you ready to turn back the clocks to the 1800s for up to three years?Our grandfathers and great-grandfathers were the last generation to practice the basic things that we call survival skills now. ….Watch this video and you will find many interesting things!

All this while no supply was heard of, neither knew they when they might expect any. So they began to think how they might raise as much corn as they could, and obtain a better crop than they had done, that they might not still thus languish in misery. At length, after much debate of things, the Governor (with the advise of the chiefest among them) gave way that they should set corn every man for his own particular, and in that regard trust to themselves; in all other things to go in the general way as before. And so assigned to every family a parcel of land, according to the proportion of the number, for that end, only for present use (but made no division for inheritance) and ranged all boys and youth under some family. This had very good success, for it made all hands industrious, so as much more corn was planted than otherwise would have been by any means the Governor or any other could use, and saved him a great deal of trouble, and gave far better content. The women now went willingly into the field, and took their little ones with them to set corn; which before would allege weakness and inability; whom to have compelled would have been thought great tyranny and oppression.

With weak crops and little hope of supply, the Pilgrims divided the parcels among the families and told them to grow their own food. They found that those who would pretend they couldn’t work due to infirmity, weakness or inability (sound familiar?) gladly went to work in the fields. Corn production increased dramatically and famine was averted because communism was eliminated. Bradford’s account doesn’t end here; he goes on to describe why he believed the communal system failed. Understanding the reasons for the failure is just as important, if not more important, than learning about the failure itself. Governor Bradford wrote:

The experience that was had in this common course and condition, tried sundry years and that amongst godly and sober men, may well evince the vanity of that conceit of Plato’s and other ancients applauded by some of later times; that the taking away of property and bringing in community into a commonwealth would make them happy and flourishing; as if they were wiser than God. For this community (so far as it was) was found to breed much confusion and discontent and retard much employment that would have been to their benefit and comfort. For the young men, that were most able and fit for labour and service, did repine that they should spend their time and strength to work for other men’s wives and children without any recompense. The strong, or man of parts, had no more division of victuals and clothes than he that was weak and not able to do a quarter than the other could; this was thought injustice. The aged and graver men to be ranked and equalized in labours, victuals, clothes, etc., with the meaner and younger sort, thought it some indignity and disrespect unto them. And for men’s wives to be commanded to do service for other men, as dressing their meat, washing their clothes, etc., they deemed it a kind of slavery, neither could many husbands well brook it.

The famine that nearly wiped out the Pilgrims in 1623 gave way to a period of agricultural abundance that enabled the Massachusetts settlers to set down permanent roots in the New World, prosper, and play an indispensable role in the ultimate success of the American experiment.

The communal system failed because it treated the older and wiser the same way as the young and brash. It failed because it rewarded the less productive as much as the more productive. It failed because members of the community found that they could do less and still get the same benefit. All of these problems arose in a very religious community in which gluttony and laziness were considered sins and drunkenness was rare. How much more would communism fail in a larger society where such problems are rampant! By returning to a system in which the older and wiser are respected, and by reorganizing so that one’s benefit was directly tied to his production, the Pilgrims ensured the survival of their colony. Governor Bradford, however, ultimately attributes the failure of the “common cause” to something much deeper:

Upon the point all being to have alike and to do alike, they thought themselves in the like condition, and one as good as another; and so, if it did not cut off those relations that God hath set amongst men, yet it did at least much diminish and take off the mutual respects that should be preserved amongst them. And would have been worse if they had been men of another condition. Let none object this is men’s corruption, and nothing to the course itself. I answer, seeing all men have this corruption in them, God in His wisdom saw another course fitter for them.

Governor Bradford is basically saying that communism failed because of the corrupt nature of humans. People are imperfect and sinful. The utopia Marx and Lenin dreamed of could only work if it were filled with perfect people- and no such infallible people can be found in this world. Furthermore, the communal system undermines the relations God instituted among men- marriage and family. With husbands growing food for other people’s children, wives washing other men’s clothes, and children doing chores for other families, the basic foundational social unit of society is undermined. Without that, no society can hope to survive.


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TODAY . . .

Plymouth’s Pilgrims may have survived that near-fatal brush with socialism but, sadly, many political leaders remain transfixed by a blind faith in the ability of government to shape and set the course of human behavior.

Case in point: the tenacious liberal belief that no connection exists between the tax burden we place on capital formation and the economic behavior of those who must shoulder that burden.

The liberal creed holds that investors will take economic risks and create jobs no matter how punitive the tax regime. THAT BELIEF IS IN ERROR.

To liberals, lowering that burden through reductions in the rate of taxation simply bestows an unwarranted windfall on the “rich” and deprives the government of much-needed tax revenue.

In reality, no government can do better for individuals than they can do for themselves.  

The hard workers, the reliable and the thrifty choose freedom.  Only the lazy, the jealous, and the envious choose communism/socialism.