Category Archives: diy

HOW TO PREPARE LACTUCA TINCTURE-A NATURAL ANALGESIC THAT WORKS LIKE MORPHINE AND GROWS IN YOUR BACKYARD-PART II

HOW TO PREPARE LACTUCA TINCTURE-A NATURAL ANALGESIC THAT WORKS LIKE MORPHINE AND GROWS IN YOUR BACKYARD-PART II

Throughout history, medicinal herbs were the only thing available when someone was injured or sick.

The emergence of modern medicine made humanity forget about how powerful nature is.

For example, wild lettuce (Lactusa virosa) is a plant that grows in England and North America and has been used as a natural painkiller that works just as good as painkillers.

WHAT IS WILD LETTUCE?

Wild lettuce is a biennial plant that can be found throughout England. It grows very tall (up to 7 feet), and has a pretty yellow flower and mature leaves. The plant has been used as a sedative and analgesic in the past, and possesses numerous health benefits. Here are some of them:

A NATURAL SEDATIVE

Wild lettuce is often used to fight insomnia and to relax anxiety or spasms. The herb can calm down the nervous system and relax your muscles, while also fighting stress-induced indigestion, coughs and respiratory problems, restlessness and insomnia.natural painkiller.

TINCTURE PREPARATION

Here is the current recipe I use for making a strong Lactuca tincture. I began preparing it in this way in reaction to feeling that Lactuca tincture I tried did not have the sedative anodyne clout that I read about and hoped to see. So, this was an experiment. And I hope to learn other methods as people experiment and share their results. 

With preparing this form of Lactuca tincture, it is important to have all aspects and equipment prepared beforehand such as knowing where there is a stand of Lactuca growing, having your equipment ready, and knowing that you have enough time during the days it takes to make it, which aren’t much, less than 2 hours per day for about 5 days. Read on. 

Basically, I use this form of preparation to condense the latex in the plant which I assume contains most of its nervine qualities. Otherwise one ends up with a weak medicine due to all the ‘roughage’ that is a part of these stately plants. The goal is to maximize the concentration of latex. This is a bit of a challenge with Lactuca, as there is a lot of plant matter to work around to get the latex without the mainly inert cellulose and other plant matter. 

Tools 

1.Pruners-to cut plants
2.Tincture press
3.Ethanol-95%
4.Blender- a good sturdy one
5.Stove 
6.Stainless steel pot

Preparation


1.Find a stand of Lactuca plants. I have used a number of species and they all seem useful, though some more careful observations of species may help figure this out. I have not used any close relatives that also yield latex, such as Sonchus. 

2.The best time to make this tincture is when the plant is at its maximum latex yield, which seems to be around when it is just going to flower. It is easy to see the amount of latex, remove a leaf and the white milky latex should flow freely.

3.While all parts of Lactuca contain this latex, I just make the medicine from the aboveground parts, as it is just easier to not have to wash and cut up the roots, though I may be missing something here, as the roots do exude a fair bit of the latex. 

4.Cut a few Lactuca stalks.

5.Bring them right away to where you will be processing them into tincture.

6.Cut them up into blender-size pieces.

7.Put them in the blender, and cover with ethanol.

8.Blend.

9.Add as much ethanol and material as you can to get a big wad of blenderized Lactuca stem, saturated in ethanol.

10.Let sit overnight (or longer).

11.Press tincture in tincture press.

12.Cut more Lactuca.

13.Cut into blender-size pieces.

14.Put in blender, add the menstruum that you recently pressed.

15.Add this into the blender, along with enough 95% ethanol to cover and blend.

16.Let sit overnight.

17.Follow this process for a few days, cut, add menstruum from previously pressed tincture, blend, and add enough ethanol to get the juice out. And then press this for the next batch. 

18.After a few days of this you should have a fair bit of fluid (menstruum).

19.Put this in a stainless steel pot.

20.Bring to a high simmer.

21.Evaporte and reduce the fluid so it gets more black and ‘tar-like’.

22.This is your medicine.

23.Be aware, that as you simmer, ethanol evaporates at a lower temperature than water, so make sure there is enough ethanol in your final product to keep it stable.

24.Enjoy and let me know the results. 

Check the video below for more information about this miracle plant:Lactuca Virosa

7 Health Benefits of Lactuca

1.Lettuce holds anti-inflammatory properties.

Lactuca possesses anti-inflammatory properties that help control inflammation. Research has shown that lactuca extracts have proteins, like lipoxygenase and carrageenan to control inflammation.

2.Lactuca has antimicrobial properties.

The latex of lettuce has antimicrobial properties that completely deform yeasts using terpenes and cardenolides, as well as enzymes like glucanases.

3.Lactuca can help induce sleep.

Research from the Texas A&M University has suggested that lettuce extract can have significant sedative effects. Decreased heart rate and ventricular contractions were also discovered. This chemical works by blocking the excitatory signal processes of muscular and neural tissues.

4.Lactuca can help control your anxiety.

Not only does lettuce have sedative effects. Animal research has shown that lactuca can have anxiolytic (anti-anxiety) properties.

5.Lactuca  has anti-cancer properties.

Lactuca leaf extracts can control leukemia cells and breast cancer cells. Also, lactuca contains antioxidants, which have shown to seek and destroy free radicals that mutate healthy cells and turn them into cancer cells.

6.Lactuca can help your eyes and skin beautiful looking.

Lactuca is a rich source of vitamin A. This compound promotes better eye health and has the ability to prevent macular degeneration and cataract formation. One cup of lettuce contains 82 percent of the daily recommended value of vitamin A.

7.Lactuca may help improve your brain cognition.

Several components of spinach like potassium, folate, and various antioxidants are known to provide neurological benefits. Folate has been known to reduce the occurrence of Alzheimer’s disease and cognitive decline. Potassium has been linked to increase blood flow to the brain and heightened cognition, concentration, and neural activity.


Source:http://www.7song.com  http://www.dovemed.com

5 comments

  1. DORLIS GROTE 6 August, 2017 at 14:50 Reply

    Question: What does the ethanol do, what is it’s purpose? Where do I get it and is there something I can substitute?

  2. Ruth 13 August, 2017 at 05:16 Reply

    I made some wild lettuce tea by cutting up leaves big pieces in a crock pot on warm filled with filtered water just enough to cover. let it set 24 hrs on warm. then I squeezed the leaves as i removed them in handfuls. I tied them together to hang dry them. the water in the crock pot was a dark brown. I left the water in the crock pot to evaporate. well after finding out I wasn’t going to get my pain meds that ive been on for 15 yrs. I took some of the brown water & strained it through chz cloth into a mason jar. I poured me a 1/2 of coffee cup of it. took a little sip. YUCK, I mixed in some local organic honey & organic sugar drank it down in 2 gulps. in about 15 min. I was feeling no pain & was comatose. I laid in bed& had the best sleep in forever, lifelike dreams. it was amazing! I slept about 3 hrs. & had to pee. it took 45 more min. to get up to go pee. after I went pee, I went back to the kitchen made a whole coffee cup of wild lettuce tea with honey & sugar. it didn’t taste quite as bad, I gulped it went back to bed slept the rest of the afternoon & all night. got up @ 7 am. still very relaxed, not much pain, felt sexually ambitious but other than that I had no ambition, no appetite, happy. not something you can take for pain & go to work. I DONT even recommend DRIVING & ive worked & drove on opiates for 15 yrs. ready to go find more & make another batch before it gets too late in the yr. to find more. I also got mine right @ flowering. ive read that’s the best time to get the most white milky which has all the pain killing agent in it. Just be careful!!! WARNING too much can lead to such relaxed breathing that you STOP breathing.
    I also tried cutting up the stems & roots & put them in another slow cooker with filtered water on warm for 24hrs. it was a light brown. I filtered it & put it in a mason jar but I haven’t tried it yet.

This Pioneering Grandma is Building These Tiny Sustainable Homes Out of Hemp

This Pioneering Grandma is Building These Tiny Sustainable Homes Out of Hemp

Hemp is the only plant that can feed you, house you, clothe you and heal you.

The DEA considers hemp to be a dangerous substance and it’s still classified as a schedule I drug, alongside heroin and ecstasy, even though the plant contains almost no THC and has no psychoactive effects. Many believe this classification is the result of the oil industry’s grip on the legislative process in America, because hemp is one of the most viable alternatives to plastics, fuel and other building materials, in fact, it used to be an important domestically produced crop, and it even contains extraordinary health benefits.

There seems to be a common setback for people afraid to make their dreams become a reality: They don’t know where to start. Not having experience in something doesn’t make you any less capable of creating greatness or fulfilling your passions, but it does take an open mind, a whole lot of patience, and ultimately, the confidence that you can do it.

In a world where old age seems to work against people’s confidence in you, Pam Bosch shows having confidence in yourself is all it really takes to prove them wrong. The grandmother from Bellingham, Washington, has never built a home before, but is breaking barriers in the tiny home movement through what she views as a pioneering experiment in sustainable living.

Her organization, called Highland Hemp House, used imported hemp from Europe to construct tiny homes boasting model energy and resource efficiency.

“Anybody can do this. Grandma can do this. Grandma’s doing it,” the 62-year-old artist says. Bosch was determined to build homes out of hemp after learning about its incredible sustainability and the minimal impact it has on the planet compared to other building materials.

“We should have as many buildings as we can that are built out of a renewable resource that sequesters carbon, that is healthy and if it were legal would be very affordable. It’s an agricultural waste product we’re using,” she continued.

Hemp is considered a dangerous substance by the DEA and is classified a schedule I drug, like heroin and ecstasy, despite the plant containing almost no THC and having zero psychoactive effects. The classification is thought by many to be backed by the oil industry, which sees hemp as a profitable threat, thanks to it being one of the best alternatives to plastics, fuel, and various building materials.

Hemp is also valuable to farmers, who can use it for soil remediation, plastic composites, organic body care, biofuels, and health foods. In Washington, hemp is now legal for livestock feed, but requires permission from the DEA until other uses are legalized and regulated.

For building a tiny hemp home, Bosch says it’s great for creating the plaster, so long as weather conditions are right. “You want conditions like we’re starting to see now – overcast, high humidity, because you don’t want it to dry out too fast,” she notes.

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Because permits for hemp houses don’t exist, Bosch has to stay within 120 square feet. “I’m investing in this because I believe in it and believe someone’s got to do it to make it legal,” she says.

Human impact on the planet continues to change our environment, making it essential that we become more conscious of how and with what materials we build things.

Tiny homes contribute to the awareness that we can thrive in smaller spaces while also creating a sustainable future.

Check out the video below to see how Bolsch is becoming a pioneer in the tiny home movement, and proves that anyone can do it.

Have You Ever Heard About Hempcrete?

 

When it comes to new and sustainable housing ideas, it seems to always be about creating a more efficient home in terms of insulation, lighting, electricity, etc. Mainstream belief  on the subject would have you believe that top corporations and government projects are working with the best possible technology to bring forth solutions that work and are going to be great for the environment. If that was truly the case, I can guarantee you that the whole world would be using Hempcrete right now. Haven’t heard of it? I’m not too surprised.

First off, what is Hempcrete? Hempcrete is a building material that incorporates hemp into its mixture. Hempcrete is very versatile as it can be used for wall insulation, flooring, walls, roofing and more. It’s fire-proof, water-proof, and rot-proof as long as it’s above ground. Hempcrete is made from the shiv or inside stem of the hemp plant and is then mixed with a lime base binder to create the building material. This mixture creates a negative carbon footprint for those who are concerned with the carbon side of things. Hempcrete is much more versatile, easy to work with and pliable than concrete. In fact, earthquakes cannot crack these structures as they are 3 times more resistant than regular concrete.

READ MORE:

The Cancer Miracle : Cannabis And Coconut Oil Make Powerful Mixture To Kill Cancer Cells – Say NO Chemotherapy and Radiation


Since lime is the binding material, builders do not have to heat up the lime as much as a supplier would need to in the industrial creation of concrete. This results in a lot of energy conservation when producing Hempcrete vs. concrete. Jumping back to the carbon aspect, Hempcrete sequesters (hides or puts away) carbon as it is very high in cellulose. Through it’s growing life cycle, it takes in large amounts of carbon which is then built into the home or building it is being used to construct. This does not allow the carbon to be released into the atmosphere. A home can save about 20,000lbs of carbon when being built out of Hempcrete

Hempcrete is a much more superior building material due to the fact that it is a very strong, lightweight and breathable material. When used as exterior walls, it lets water in without rotting or damaging the material. In a practical sense, instead of needing to build homes with space between exterior walls, which are then filled with insulation, you can simply use a Hempcrete wall. As humidity is taken in from the external environment, the Hempcrete holds that humidity until it is ready to be released again when the climate is less humid. Since the lime is wrapped in cellulose, the lime takes a bit longer for it to fully  petrify but is still incredibly strong. Over time, the lime looks to turn back to a rock, so the material becomes harder and harder until it petrifies completely. This means the wall will last thousands of years vs. 40 – 100 like normal building materials today.  Another great aspect to Hempcrete is that if too much is mixed during building, you can return it to the soil as a great fertilizer. Since hemp grows to maturity in just 14 weeks, it is a very powerful, versatile, cheap and sustainable solution.

Other notable factors are that hemp requires no fertilizer, weed killer pesticide or fungicide to grow it. The hemp seed can be harvested as a nutritious food rich in Omega-3 oil, amino acids, protein and fiber. It is considered a “super food”. The outer fibers can be used for clothes, paper and numerous every day items. This truly is a very powerful plant and should be a no brainer when it comes to it being used in a very mainstream way.


Why seniors are flocking  to medical marijuana??

Imagining your grandmother smoking a joint might make you giggle. But the reality is that many senior citizens are discovering the medical powers of marijuana.

The Lost Ways…a true story about our grandparents days!

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Why Is Hemp Illegal? 

Hemp looks very much like marijuana and is technically in the same family of plants. But unlike modern maryjane, it does not contain anywhere near the amount of THC needed for someone to get high if they were to smoke it. The funny thing is, in the United States, hemp is just as illegal to grow as marijuana is. But how can this be? If we can’t get high from it, then what’s the problem?

In the past, hemp was used for many things: clothes, cars, plastics, building materials, rope, paper, linens, food, medicine and so on. In fact, it used to be mandatory in the United States for farmers to grow hemp if they had the land. You can find out even more about hemp here.

The fact is, hemp was very popular throughout the 1800s and 1900s because it was incredibly useful and easy to grow, and its derived products were so long lasting. But one day that all changed; it became illegal and so did its friend cannabis (marijuana). How did this happen?

The History

During Hoover’s presidency, Andrew Mellon became Hoover’s Secretary of the Treasury and Dupont’s primary investor. He appointed his future nephew-in-law, Harry J. Anslinger, to head the Federal Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs.

Secret meetings were held by these financial tycoons. Hemp was declared dangerous and a threat to their billion dollar enterprises. For their dynasties to remain intact, hemp had to go. This then led them to take an obscure Mexican slang word – ‘marihuana’ – and push it into the consciousness of America. The reason why they changed the name was because everyone knew of hemp and how amazing it was for the world. They would never be able to get away with banning hemp, so they used a name they knew no one would recognize. 

Not long after this plan was set in place, the media began a blitz of ‘yellow journalism’ in the late 1920s and 1930s. Yellow journalism is essentially journalism where stories with catchy headlines are put into the mainstream media to get attention, yet these stories are not well researched or backed up. They are often used simply to sway public opinion. Many newspapers were pumping stories emphasizing the horrors and dangers of marihuana. The “menace” of marihuana made headlines everywhere. Readers learned that it was responsible for everything from car accidents to looser morals, and it wasn’t long before public opinion started to shape.

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Next came several films like Reefer Madness (1936), Marihuana: Assassin of Youth (1935) andMarihuana: The Devil’s Weed (1936), which were all propaganda films designed by these industrialists to create an enemy out of marihuana. Reefer Madness was possibly the most interesting of the films, as it depicted a man going crazy from smoking marijuana and then murdering his family with an axe. With all of these films, the goal was to gain public support so that anti-marihuana laws could be passed without objection.

Have a look at the following regarding marihuana from The Burning Question, aka Reefer Madness:

  • A violent narcotic
  • Acts of shocking violence
  • Incurable insanity
  • Soul-destroying effects
  • Under the influence of the drug he killed his entire family with an axe
  • More vicious, more deadly even than these soul-destroying drugs (heroin, cocaine), is the menace of marihuana!

Unlike most films with a simple ending, Reefer Madness ended with bold words on the screen: TELL YOUR CHILDREN.

In the 1930s, things were different from today in significant ways. The population did not question authority or the media to the extent that we do now, and they did not have tools like the Internet to quickly spread information and learn about things that were happening. Most built their opinions and beliefs off of the news via print, radio, or cinema. As a result (and thanks to the explicit instruction of mainstream news), many people did tell their children about marihuana. Thus, public opinion about this plant was formed.

On April 14, 1937, the Prohibitive Marihuana Tax Law, the bill that outlawed hemp, was directly brought to the House Committee on Ways and Means. Simply put, this committee is the only one that could introduce a bill to the House floor without it being debated by other committees. At the time, the Chairman of the Ways and Means was Robert Doughton, who was a Dupont supporter. With vested interest, he insured that the bill would pass in Congress.

In an attempt to prevent the bill from being passed, Dr. James Woodward, a physician and attorney, attempted to testify on behalf of the American Medical Association. He mentioned that the reason the AMA had not denounced the Marihuana Tax Law sooner was that the Association had just discovered that marihuana was hemp (or at least a strain of it).

Hemp and marijuana are both varieties of Cannabis sativa, but this distinction was purposefully obscured from the public. Since the law was not focused on banning one or the other, both found their way into the ban. The AMA recognized cannabis/marihuana as a medicine found in numerous healing products sold that had been used for quite some time. The AMA, like many others, did not realize that the deadly menace they had been reading about in the media was in fact hemp.

In September of 1937, hemp prohibition began. What was arguably the most useful plant known to man at the time, at least in the West, became illegal to grow and use: cannabis (marijuana) and hemp, one used to give a bad name to the other, even though neither should have realistically garnered that negative backlash. To this day, this plant is still illegal to grow in the United States.

READ MORE:

Road to Prohibition: Why Did America Make Marijuana Illegal in the First Place?BECAUSE BILLIONAIRES WANT TO REMAIN BILLIONAIRES!


To the public, Congress banned hemp and cannabis because it was said to be a violent and dangerous drug. In reality, hemp does nothing more than act as an amazing resource to virtually any industry and any product, and cannabis is and can be a useful medical substance that, when administered correctly, can have many benefits. But it should also be mentioned that cannabis has been abused over the years and does have its negative side effects. This is a reality many in the community don’t want to admit but it has to be said. We know the effects it has on regular users under 25 years old as well as what heavy regular use can do to serotonin levels. 

Fast forward to today, and it is clear we are in some trouble when it comes to how we treat our environment. The resources and practices we use today for energy, as well as product creation, are very harmful and toxic to not just our planet but ourselves. Despite the awareness that exists about hemp as an option to transform how things can be done on this planet, governments continue to ban this plant, and it is still often mistaken for marihuana due to their similar appearance.

Luckily, much more cultural and regulatory progress is being made on the side of cannabis to not only illustrate the value of it medically, but also to better understand its potential dangers. This helps to work out the difference between fact and fiction so we can use the plant responsibly while taking advantage of its benefits.

Sources:

https://www.mcgill.ca/newsroom/channels/news/study-cannabis-double-edged-sword 27677 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kCxg1sVYbV4

http://www.hempfarm.org/Papers/Hemp_Facts.html

http://www.hempcar.org/hempfacts.shtml

http://www.collective-evolution.com

The Miracle Farm ! How To Build a Miracle Farm Step By Step

The Miracle Farm ! How To Build a Miracle Farm Step By Step

Have you ever wondered what your family would do to survive if life the way we know it today suddenly game to an end? Just imagine for a moment you are in one of those popular Hollywood films set in some post-apocalyptic world where food and water are scarce. How would you provide for your family? If You’re a prepper – you know exactly what I’m talking about!

Now imagine something else – imagine losing your job and not being able to provide for your children. Imagine needing fresh food and water but asking your loved ones to go without. Sadly, this isn’t some film – this is the reality that many people face.

Now what if you are just a normal person, like myself, who is looking for ways to provide fresh, clean, and plentiful food for your family as well as pure water at costs that mean you can start saving and paying off those bills? Or what if you are someone who has money, but doesn’t want processed foods or would simply like to establish their own sustainable existence?

No matter which scenario you might find yourself in (most likely you are like me, looking to save a little money and create a more sustainable existence), The Miracle Farm from selfreplenshingfoodfarm.com is a revolutionary approach you need to look into.

The Miracle Farm Product Details

The Miracle Farm is built upon the Miracle Farm Blueprint from selfreplenishingfoodfarm.com. If you are not familiar with it, let me break it down for you:

The system is designed to do one thing: provide people with the highest quality and freshest organic food along with the purest and cleanest water anyone has ever tasted at costs that are just a fraction of what modern consumers pay for lesser quality goods. This is not made up – this is real and was developed as part of disaster relief initiatives around the globe where the need to feed large numbers of people on a small amount of money is acute.

Here’s how the system works:

It teaches you how to setup your own home garden that will produce AMAZING results. It works no matter where you live or what area you have to work with. Inside, outside, in the city, the country – anywhere. What’s the secret? You might not believe me but it’s all EARTHWORMS! I can’t get into how they do it here, but if you want to learn more about that side of things – just sign up or head to their site.

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Pros

I wanted my Miracle Farm review to have a bit of a personal touch. So in this section, I just cover some of my favorite things about the Miracle Farm:

* You’ll always have all the fresh, vitamin-packed, and delicious food your family needs without depending on anyone else – you can live off the grid or off the market and develop a sustainable practice for your family.

* No more relying on cheap food to feed your kids when the budget it tight. Why is this great? Because of how awful cheap food is normally when it comes to nutrition. Now, the cheapest option to feed your family is also the healthiest – what more can you want?

* The amount and variety of food you can grow is pretty amazing – all different types of tomatoes, kale, lettuces, potatoes, beans, carrots, broccoli, all kinds of fruits, and much, much more.

* My husband and I call it our own personal 24 – hour fresh salad bar!

* It’s hard to see this at first – but the more and more you eat this healthy food, the better you feel and look, and you start to crave it. It’s literally helped me transform my body as well as my finances! I no longer go to “snack cakes” and “candy” I crave the food from my garden!

* You can follow the Miracle Farm Blueprint inside or out – wherever you are you can start growing fresh, delicious food.

* It’s amazingly cheap! – Under $40 dollars and it includes 3 bonuses that will help your family prep, get clean drinking water in an emergency, and survive no matter what happens.

* When a product is guaranteed, you know you can trust it. Why? Because you have 60 days. Try it out and if it doesn’t work for you – get your money back! That easy!

Cons

I want my Miracle Farm review to have a balanced approach as well. Therefore, I like to include a section of things I feel you should consider more closely. These things aren’t really “bad” in and of themselves, but they can make or break if Miracle Farm is right for you:

* This is an internet only program and as us preppers know – you can’t count on the internet or electricity when it all hits the fan. It’d be nice if it was setup in a way to make it easier to get an in-print version. That being said – for now, it’s great advice, just store a local copy and print it to be safe.

* If you have dietary needs that for some reason prevent you from having a diet that is predominantly made up of fruits and vegetables (like an allergy) this is probably not the best program for you.

* It has to be said – working with worms is just gross for some of us! If you don’t like worms, well, that may be a problem.

To sum it all up…

I really get the fact that not every product is for everyone, and on top of that – few if any of us can afford every product we think we might want to try. So when it comes down to brass tax – is Miracle Farm really worth the money? Here’s my honest opinion:

This is a must buy! It’s cheap – under $40! It’s spot-on, that is – it works! And it’s something that is good for almost any human being – who doesn’t want more cheap fresh fruit and vegetables that are clean and safe to eat? To me if they give you your money back, there is no risk – this is a no brainer for anyone halfway interested, so buy today, you will not regret it.


The Miracle Farm-Video Below

How To Make The Perfect Hay Bale Gardening For Spring-Step By Step-Hay Bale Gardening Effortless Food Production with No Weeds, No Fertilizer & Less Watering

How To Make The Perfect Hay Bale Gardening For Spring-Step By Step-Hay Bale Gardening Effortless Food Production with No Weeds, No Fertilizer & Less Watering

We have decided to do Hay Bale gardening this year in Louisiana. This video shows us getting everything set up and the conditioning process started. No more worries about the yard flooding. The Hay Bale Garden series begins….

Hay bale gardening is probably the most fun you’ll have growing your own food and herbs, requiring almost no work or maintenance.

After a search online to find the simplest and easiest “no work” gardening method, I stumbled upon straw bale gardening. The concept is simple: You plant directly into bales of straw, and as the season progresses, the straw is broken down into virgin soil that nourishes the plants from inside the bale. One amazing benefit of this method of gardening is that the bales provide a raised bed, which keeps predators away and makes picking your vegetal treasures at the end of the season easy on the back. I watched every video I could find on the subject, and have since concluded that using HAY bales instead of STRAW bales is far superior.

Why Hay Bales are Superior to Straw Bales?

Before we get into why hay bales are superior to straw bales, let’s first define what they are:
Straw bales are basically stalks of plants, usually corn, that have been dried out and baled together into various shapes and sizes.
Hay bales are grasses that have been dried and baled together.

In my research, the idea that hay bales may have seeds in them and could grow weeds is the same reasoning reiterated time and time again by proponents of straw bale gardening. The reason why this idea holds little water is that when nitrogen is added to feed the bacteria and fungi to start the decomposition process of the bale, a process called “Conditioning your bale”, the interior of the bale can reach temperatures as high as 130 degrees Fahrenheit or more.

The likelihood of seeds surviving these extreme temperatures is slim, and a number of other benefits that come from using hay bales make it a far superior approach in my opinion.

-Straw is likely made from genetically modified plant matter – The problem with straw bales is that they will usually be made of genetically modified corn or soy. Do you really want your food growing in decomposing genetically modified plant matter?


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There is an old saying that our great-grandparents used to know:

Once in life you need a doctor, a lawyer, a policeman, and a preacher, but every day, three times a day, you need a FARMER.”

The Lost Ways…. A True Story About Our Grandparents Days!

They got things done or else we wouldn’t be here!Watch this video and you will find many interesting things!Watch this FREE Video


-No fertilizer needed with hay – Hay is made of dried grasses, and for its ability to convert sunlight and soil minerals into dense nutrition, it has been said that grass is the healthiest plant on the planet. When we use hay bales for gardening (as opposed to straw bales), the compost that is formed within the bale to feed the plants is far superior in nutrition and, unlike straw bales, no fertilizer needs to be added to feed your plants throughout the season.

Less Watering – Straw holds water less effectively than hay, so instead of watering once per day with hay bales, you might have to do it 2 or 3 times per day.I like your concept

How to Grow a Hay Bale Garden

1

The first step to growing a hay bale garden is to acquire your hay bales. Take a look on your local classifieds like Kijiji or Craigslist and find a local farmer who is selling them. Once you find a nearby farmer with 40lb hay bales for sale, email them and arrange a time to pick them up or have them delivered to you.

Once you have the bales and have arranged them in your yard, the next step is to “condition” your bales. Buy yourself some 42-0-0 fertilizer, or some urea (nitrogen), and from here you will be introducing nitrogen into the bales over a 10-day period that will have the fungi, bacteria and insects breaking down your bales into fresh, virgin compost to feed your plants. You can also pee on your bales, as it is high in nitrogen and minerals, so start saving up pee in bottles for a fertilizer cost savings of about $40.

Days 1,3,5,7,9 – Add 1/2 cup of nitrogen to your bales and spray them with water so the nitrogen will soak in.
Days 2,4,6,8,10 – Soak the bale with water only.

1

During the conditioning process, the temperature of the bale will rise significantly, from my research, up to 140 degrees Fahrenheit. In fact, the bales will become so hot that it’s important to keep the bales wet to eliminate the risk of a fire. Although risk of fire is minimal, keep this in mind when deciding where to stage your bales. When the conditioning process is complete, you’ll know it because the temperature inside the bale will have come back down from hot to warm. Now you’re ready to plant!

Simply plant your vegetable seeds or germinated seeds into the bale, water them once a day and you’re on your way to healthy produce in a few exciting months. The best part is, at the end of the season you’ll have yourself a heap of fresh compost that you can further compost or add to your other gardens or perennial plant beds for nourishment.


DIY Home Energy System–Learn how to produce off-grid power-How to Slash Your Power Bill by up to 75% (or more) in less than 30 days – Guaranteed!

See the video below for more information on how to get started:

Once Upon a Time in America…Are you ready to turn back the clocks to the 1800s for up to three years?Our grandfathers and great-grandfathers were the last generation to practice the basic things that we call survival skills now. …

How North American Indians and Early Pioneers Made Pemmican?Watch the video below!

By,Mark David  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tF_FvSQTL6M

3 comments

  1. Monti 24 August, 2017 at 15:29 Reply

    Title includes the text “No Fertilizer”.

    Article text
    “-No fertilizer needed with hay –
    no fertilizer needs to be added

    next step is to “condition” your bales. Buy yourself some 42-0-0 FERTILIZER ”

    Fail

How To Make Walnut Oil: a Step-to-Step Guide – 7 Benefits Of Walnuts

How To Make Walnut Oil: a Step-to-Step Guide – 7 Benefits Of Walnuts

Walnuts supply your body with many nutrients and vitamins.The effect of walnut is so amazing that many people have health benefits after just 4 hours of consumption.

7 Top Reasons to Eat Walnuts

Walnuts belong to the tree nut family, along with Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamia nuts, pecans, pine nuts, and pistachios. Each has its own unique nutritional profile.

One-quarter cup of walnuts, for instance, provides more than 100 percent of the daily recommended value of plant-based omega-3 fats, along with high amounts of copper, manganese, molybdenum, and biotin. Some of the most exciting research about walnuts includes:

1.Cancer-Fighting Properties

Walnuts may help reduce not only the risk of prostate cancer, but breast cancer as well. In one study, mice that ate the human equivalent of 2.4 ounces of whole walnuts for 18 weeks had significantly smaller and slower-growing prostate tumors compared to the control group that consumed the same amount of fat but from other sources.

Overall the whole walnut diet reduced prostate cancer growth by 30 to 40 percent. According to another study on mice, the human equivalent of just two handfuls of walnuts a day cut breast cancer risk in half, and slowed tumor growth by 50 percent as well.

2.Heart Health

Walnuts contain the amino acid l-arginine, which offers multiple vascular benefits to people with heart disease, or those who have increased risk for heart disease due to multiple cardiac risk factors.

If you struggle with herpes, you may want to avoid or limit walnuts, as high levels of arginine can deplete the amino acid lysine, which can trigger herpes recurrences.

Walnuts also contain the plant-based omega-3 fat alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), which is anti-inflammatory and may prevent the formation of pathological blood clots. Research shows that people who eat a diet high in ALA are less likely to have a fatal heart attack and have a nearly 50 percent lower risk of sudden cardiac death.

Eating just four walnuts a day has been shown to significantly raise blood levels of heart-healthy ALA, and walnut consumption supports healthful cholesterol levels.

Separate research showed that eating just one ounce of walnuts a day may decrease cardiovascular risk,and among those at high cardiovascular risk, increased frequency of nut consumption significantly lowers the risk of death.


SEE ALSO: This Lost Super-Food Will Bulletproof You Against Any Food Shortage Or Famine !


3.Rare and Powerful Antioxidants

Antioxidants are crucial to your health, as they are believed to help control how fast you age by combating free radicals, which are at the heart of age-related deterioration.

Walnuts contain several unique and powerful antioxidants that are available in only a few commonly eaten foods. This includes the quinone juglone, the tannin tellimagrandin, and the flavonol morin.

Walnuts contain antioxidants that are so powerful at free-radical scavenging that researchers called them “remarkable,” and research has shown that walnut polyphenols may help prevent chemically-induced liver damage.

In another study, researchers found that nuts, especially walnuts, have potent antioxidant powers. Walnut polyphenols had the best efficacy among the nuts tested and also the highest lipoprotein-bound antioxidant activity. The researchers concluded:

“Nuts are high in polyphenol antioxidants which by binding to lipoproteins would inhibit oxidative processes that lead to atherosclerosis in vivo. In human supplementation studies nuts have been shown to improve the lipid profile, increase endothelial function and reduce inflammation, all without causing weight gain.”

4.Weight Control

Adding healthful amounts of nuts such as walnuts to your diet can help you to maintain your ideal weight over time. In one review of 31 trials, those whose diets included extra nuts or nuts substituted for other foods lost about 1.4 extra pounds and half an inch from their waists. Eating walnuts is also associated with increased satiety after just three days.

5.Improved Reproductive Health in Men

One of the lesser-known benefits of walnuts is their impact on male fertility. Among men who consume a Western-style diet, adding 75 grams (a bit over one-half cup) of walnuts daily significantly improved sperm quality, including vitality, motility, and morphology.

6.Brain Health

Walnuts contain a number of neuroprotective compounds, including vitamin E, folate, melatonin, omega-3 fats, and antioxidants. Research shows walnut consumption may support brain health, including increasing inferential reasoning in young adults.

One study also found that consuming high-antioxidant foods like walnuts “can decrease the enhanced vulnerability to oxidative stress that occurs in aging,” “increase health span,” and also “enhance cognitive and motor function in aging.”

7.Diabetes

The beneficial dietary fat in walnuts has been shown to improve metabolic parameters in people with type 2 diabetes. Overweight adults with type 2 diabetes who ate one-quarter cup of walnuts daily had significant reductions in fasting insulin levels compared to those who did not, and the benefit was achieved in the first three months.


SEE ALSO : Similar to Morphine: The Best Natural Painkiller that Grows in Your Backyard


Why You Should Eat the Walnut Skin

The outermost layer of a shelled walnut – the whitish, flakey (or sometimes waxy) part – has a bitter flavor, but resist the urge to remove it. It’s thought that up to 90 percent of the antioxidants in walnuts are found in the skin, making it one of the healthiest parts to consume. To increase the positive impacts on your health, look for nuts that are organic and raw, not irradiated or pasteurized.

Furthermore, be aware that walnuts are highly perishable and their healthful fats easily damaged. If you’re purchasing shelled walnuts in bulk, avoid those that appear shriveled or smell rancid, or that you cannot verify are fresh. Walnuts should be stored in an airtight container in your refrigerator or freezer, whether they are shelled or unshelled. Walnuts are great as a quick snack, but if you’re not a fan of their flavor, you can still get their therapeutic benefits by blending them into smoothies. Or you can try one of the other healthful nuts available.

You can further improve the quality of walnuts by soaking them in water overnight, which will tend to lower some of the enzyme inhibitors and phytic acid. After soaking, you can dehydrate them at low temperature of around 105 to 110 degrees Fahrenheit until they are crispy again, as they are far more palatable when they are crunchy.

How to Make Walnut Oil: a Step-to-Step Guide

How to make walnut oil at home?Walnut oil is known for its beneficial composition and benefits for our health as according to Wikipedia  walnut oil is a source of omega-3 fatty acids essential for our health. It possesses omega-9 fats needed for a healthy heart. Moreover, it is high in vitamins B1, B2 and B3 and vitamin E, a strong antioxidant. Walnut oil has other antioxidants that protect our cells from harmful effect. Walnut oil also contains iron, magnesium, copper, niacin, zinc and selenium. And all this are in a small spoon of walnut oil. This oil isn’t sold everywhere and it is expensive. Walnut oil is cold-pressed from nuts so it is possible to make it by yourself. You will require some appliances.

You will need:

  • 6 lbs of walnuts (make sure it is English walnuts)
  • a nut cracker
  • a meat grinder
  • an oil press
  • 2 large bowls

Procedure

  1. Buy 6 lbs. of walnuts. They should be in the shell, dry and fresh. If it is possible collect them from the walnut tree when they are ripe and dry them. With the help of a nut cracker open the shell of walnuts and extract the meat out into a clean bowl.
  2. The next step of how to make walnut oil is to grind walnuts. Put a small amount into a meat grinder and continue grinding until the walnuts are fine. Grind all walnuts in such a way.
  3. After that we should warm up the walnut meat. Put it into a pot and add some water. Just a little bit. Heat the mixture for 30 minutes. Constantly stir it.
  4. Place the hot walnut meat in an oil press and squeeze the oil. Make sure that you have put a bowl under the oil press. Collect the oil in the bowl. Press all the meat. You are likely to receive about 1.5 qts. of walnut oil. The amount depends on the walnuts quality.
  5. The last thing you need to do is to filter the oil. Take a cheese cloth and pour the oil through it into a clean bowl. It is better to pour the oil into dark small bottles for storing. It is a good idea to label the bottles indicating the date of the oil pressing. Keep your oil in a refrigerator in sealed containers for up to 2 months.

HOW TO MAKE WALNUT OIL: A STEP-TO-STEP GUIDE – 7 BENEFITS OF WALNUTS

Eat 5 Walnuts, Wait for 4 Hours and See the Results. Amazing!/how-to-make-walnut-oil-a-step-to-step-guide-7-benefits-of-walnuts/

Posted by Patricia Irons on Monday, April 2, 2018


Source:https://articles.mercola.com  http://oilypedia.com

Hay Bale Gardening: Effortless Food Production with No Weeds, No Fertilizer & Less Watering

Hay Bale Gardening: Effortless Food Production with No Weeds, No Fertilizer & Less Watering

Hay bale gardening is probably the most fun you’ll have growing your own food and herbs, requiring almost no work or maintenance.

After a search online to find the simplest and easiest “no work” gardening method, I stumbled upon straw bale gardening.  The concept is simple: You plant directly into bales of straw, and as the season progresses, the straw is broken down into virgin soil that nourishes the plants from inside the bale.  One amazing benefit of this method of gardening is that the bales provide a raised bed, which keeps predators away and makes picking your vegetal treasures at the end of the season easy on the back.  I watched every video I could find on the subject, and have since concluded that using HAY bales instead of STRAW bales is far superior.

Why Hay Bales are Superior to Straw Bales?

Before we get into why hay bales are superior to straw bales, let’s first define what they are:
Straw bales are basically stalks of plants, usually corn, that have been dried out and baled together into various shapes and sizes.
Hay bales are grasses that have been dried and baled together.

In my research, the idea that hay bales may have seeds in them and could grow weeds is the same reasoning reiterated time and time again by proponents of straw bale gardening.  The reason why this idea holds little water is that when nitrogen is added to feed the bacteria and fungi to start the decomposition process of the bale, a process called “Conditioning your bale”, the interior of the bale can reach temperatures as high as 130 degrees Fahrenheit or more.

The likelihood of seeds surviving these extreme temperatures is slim, and a number of other benefits that come from using hay bales make it a far superior approach in my opinion.

-Straw is likely made from genetically modified plant matter – The problem with straw bales is that they will usually be made of genetically modified corn or soy.  Do you really want your food growing in decomposing genetically modified plant matter?


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Word of the day: Prepare! And do it the old fashion way, like our fore-fathers did it and succeed long before us, because what lies ahead of us will require all the help we can get. Watch this video and learn the 3 skills that ensured our ancestors survival in hard times of  famine and war.


-No fertilizer needed with hay – Hay is made of dried grasses, and for its ability to convert sunlight and soil minerals into dense nutrition, it has been said that grass is the healthiest plant on the planet.  When we use hay bales for gardening (as opposed to straw bales), the compost that is formed within the bale to feed the plants is far superior in nutrition and, unlike straw bales, no fertilizer needs to be added to feed your plants throughout the season.

-Less Watering – Straw holds water less effectively than hay, so instead of watering once per day with hay bales, you might have to do it 2 or 3 times per day.I like your concept

How to Grow a Hay Bale Garden

1

The first step to growing a hay bale garden is to acquire your hay bales.  Take a look on your local classifieds like Kijiji or Craigslist and find a local farmer who is selling them.  Once you find a nearby farmer with 40lb hay bales for sale, email them and arrange a time to pick them up or have them delivered to you.

READ MORE:

Hay-Bale Garden Update For Spring: Happy Growing! Success!


Once you have the bales and have arranged them in your yard, the next step is to “condition” your bales.  Buy yourself some 42-0-0 fertilizer, or some urea (nitrogen), and from here you will be introducing nitrogen into the bales over a 10-day period that will have the fungi, bacteria and insects breaking down your bales into fresh, virgin compost to feed your plants.  You can also pee on your bales, as it is high in nitrogen and minerals, so start saving up pee in bottles for a fertilizer cost savings of about $40.

Days 1,3,5,7,9 – Add 1/2 cup of nitrogen to your bales and spray them with water so the nitrogen will soak in.
Days 2,4,6,8,10 – Soak the bale with water only.

1

During the conditioning process, the temperature of the bale will rise significantly, from my research, up to 140 degrees Fahrenheit. In fact, the bales will become so hot that it’s important to keep the bales wet to eliminate the risk of a fire.  Although risk of fire is minimal, keep this in mind when deciding where to stage your bales.  When the conditioning process is complete, you’ll know it because the temperature inside the bale will have come back down from hot to warm.  Now you’re ready to plant!

Simply plant your vegetable seeds or germinated seeds into the bale, water them once a day and you’re on your way to healthy produce in a few exciting months.  The best part is, at the end of the season you’ll have yourself a heap of fresh compost that you can further compost or add to your other gardens or perennial plant beds for nourishment.


How to build a Solar Panel System -Smart Power4all ! Learn how to produce off-grid power-How to Slash Your Power Bill by up to75% (or more) in less than 30 days – Guaranteed! Video Below

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“The Garden Prepper”

See the video below for more information on how to get started:

Once Upon a Time in AmericaAre you ready to turn back the clocks to the 1800s for up to three years?Our grandfathers and great-grandfathers were the last generation to practice the basic things that we call survival skills now. ….

How North American Indians and Early Pioneers Made Pemmican?Watch this video and you will find many interesting things!

By,Mark David

Source:https://www.endalldisease.com

1 comment

  1. Lucy Clark 27 July, 2018 at 01:39 Reply

    I Love organic farming, it is a lifeline. recently AP state in India successfully made use of zero budget farming and made huge productivity. Now it’s time to say bye to chemical farming. We have to save our land from degradation.

HAY-BALE-GARDENING-POTATOES:YOU’LL NEVER GROW POTATOES ANY OTHER WAY AGAIN ! STEP BY STEP FULL GUIDE

HAY-BALE-GARDENING-POTATOES:YOU’LL NEVER GROW POTATOES ANY OTHER WAY AGAIN ! STEP BY STEP FULL GUIDE

Potato harvest from bales is easy, with no fork or shovel, simply cut the strings and kick over the bales, and pick up the potatoes. No marks on the potatoes from the forks or shovels, so they will store well, unblemished. Wrap them in brown paper, this helps them store longer. Keep them in a dry cool place, and check your stock often, tossing out any that have gotten soft or begun to rot. You’ll have delicious potatoes until the following summer when new stock will be ready again.

In normal soil gardens it is important to hill up the soil around the stem as the potato emerges. This is important because potatoes form on on the stem not on the roots. If planted too deep in the soil, the stem has a hard time emerging, because it cannot push up more than a few inches of soil. In a straw bale, we simply plant the potato cutting deep into the bale.

While a bale may be 20″ high, we will plant 16-18″ deep in a “crack” in the bale. The looseness of the bale will allow the stem to easily reach the surface, and the potatoes will form along this stretch of stem, filling the bale with potatoes. I suggest two or three potatoes in a bale, even while planting other crops on the surface of the bale.


ARTICLE – 26 DIY ROOT CELLAR PLANS & IDEAS UNDER $400 TO KEEP YOUR HARVEST FRESH WITHOUT REFRIGERATORS


 

These “surface” plantings will be harvested early before the potato vine has stretched its way above and around the bale. Wait for the vine to flower and this is the earliest the potatoes will be ready, however waiting for the vine to wither later in the fall will allow the potatoes inside to mature a bit longer.

Try Hay Bale Gardening, especially if you like potatoes, you’ll never go back to growing potatoes in the soil. Growing potatoes any other way will seem silly once you’ve done it this way.0

The bale set-up was actually a thrill. Maybe it’s an unfulfilled interest in engineering, but I really enjoyed the challenge of locating and grouping the bales in full sun, amongst a system of north-south lines between posts that I drove into the ground myself with a post pounder.

 I enjoyed stringing an espalier wire system (trellis) between the posts, as I imagined great climbing cucumbers, beans and tomatoes. 

When the bale conditioning was done and early May rolled around, the planting also was fun. No deep knee bends. No shins caked with dirt. No worry about compacting the soil. The straw bales top out at nearly two feet above ground, so they are ergonomically better even than raised beds for the gardener’s comfort while planting, watering, maintaining and harvesting. 

TIPS FOR GARDENING

Pre-Planting: experimenting with a couple spare hay bales

Motivated by the set-up process, I couldn’t wait for the conditioning to be over, so decided to experiment with a couple “naturally preconditioned” bales of horse hay I’d used to help insulate my beehives over the winter. (Note: Most hay contains lots of seeds that threaten to become weeds.

It also lacks straw’s ideal moisture-holding hollow stems. However, horse hay falls halfway between cattle hay and straw: it is mainly hollow-stemmed grasses without lots of seedy plants.) So just as an experiment, I used the breaking-down bee bales to get a head start at planting. 0

Preparing to plant wild potatoes.

With a trowel, I wedged deep openings and dropped in 4 or 5 sprouting eyes of some old sprouting gold potatoes. Then filled each hole with organic soil. 

Also dropped in some sections of wild potatoes, something I’d never seen before and picked at a farmer’s market in San Francisco. To date, a few hills of Golds have emerged and look pretty happy to be nestled into hay bales.

Planting: straw bales conditioned and ready

When my bales were fully conditioned the straw was nicely decomposing, its stiffness softened and easy to plunge a trowel into. So, it was time to treat myself to a trip to Seed Savers, just north of Decorah, for some heirloom plants. Tomatoes and peppers are my favorite homegrown vegetables. After choosing from so many beautiful and unusual varieties, I am inspired to try and make it to Seed Savers’ famous late summer tomato tasting. 


RECOMMENDED : NEXT TIME IF YOU SEE THIS PLANT ON YOUR YARD, NEVER PULL IT OUT – HERE’S WHY!

0


Yukon golds

To plant my starts, I scooped trowel-fulls of soil into each planting spot, gauging three tomatoes per bale or five pepper plants or a checkerboard of offset patches of greens and cucumbers.

Carrots, beets and beans I planted in straight, close-together rows. I made sure to save a little leftover straw bale so I could add plants from Lanesboro Farmer’s Market.

And I’ll plan to replace early lettuces with cold-hardy kale and arugula later in the season.

A couple humbling planting points I learned that will promise a better straw bale garden next year:  


  • Use a light potting mix, not the rich, dense composted soil which cakes and hardens as it dries out, making it hard for tiny sprouts to erupt.  


  • Don’t confuse bush beans with climbing beans. I was pleased to recall from childhood my mom soaked the bean seeds to help them sprout sooner.


  • So the beans came up in three days! But I had to plant a second row when I realized the first planting was actually the short bushy variety – not the climbers that would actually use the trellis wires I’d set up for them. I enjoy pickled string beans and have practiced two years now to put up bean pickles that don’t shrink and wrinkle due to too strong a vinegar mix. This year, I’ll have extras to practice getting the juiciness right.


  • Don’t fertilize new tomato plants. While testing out an original Rhubarb-Stinging Nettle recipe for the Rhubarb Festival’s tasting attraction, I ended up with a lot of nettles stems and scraps. So I brewed up some of that great natural fertilizing tea that fermenting nettles are famous for. Maybe the tea was a bit strong. The result: my young heirloom transplants yellowed — from the overdose of nitrogen that their root systems weren’t mature enough to handle? Maybe a wise gardener reading this could better explain. 

0

Beans…and some mushrooms.

Watering: keeping the bales moist.

The plan was to set up a fully automatic system on a timer that could function on its own – especially when I need to be away for a few days. No dragging out hoses. No standing over plants, watering each and every one.

So I dedicated a few hoses to the project, buried one that crosses the mowed lawn, added splitters with switch valves that allow me to water new fruit trees planted along my approach to the straw bale site: a bonus that bodes well for a bounty of future fruit.

A second hose splitter junction near the straw bales lets me automatically or manually trigger the soaker hose. The soaker is buried across a mowed area surrounding the bales, then snakes up and down each row of bales. The buried segments of the hose were neatly duct taped to minimize water waste. 

Heirloom tomatoes

There seems to be a learning curve to getting the soaker hose right. It’s a mystery how much water is delivered and whether that water reaches the plants’ roots. How effective is the duct tape, really, in blocking segments of the soaker hose? In the meantime, I enjoy hand-watering and inspecting the garden close-up each morning. When I have to be out-of-town, I’ll take my chances with the automatic backup. 

Another bonus.

Since the hay bale garden is on the way to our chicken coop and on the way back from the horse barn, it’s kind of fun to add a stop along the way as my husband and I make the rounds each morning and evening to watch our vegetables growing and enjoy knowing we’re a little more in control of what we eat.

It’s too early to tell whether this gardening method will yield that perfect garden I began to imagine in that Straw Bale Gardening class. But since it’s all just a fun experiment, I keep in mind that the worst that can happen is that I am left with nothing but some good compost (composted straw makes good, clean, rich, weed-free soil that could easily translate into a healthy, chemical-free, nutrient-rich raised-bed garden in any future year.) Either way, it’s a win – and a curious new spin for putting vegetables on the table.

HAY-BALE-GARDENING-POTATOES:YOU'LL NEVER GROW POTATOES ANY OTHER WAY AGAIN ! STEP BY STEP FULL GUIDE

HAY-BALE-GARDENING-POTATOES:YOU'LL NEVER GROW POTATOES ANY OTHER WAY AGAIN ! STEP BY STEP FULL GUIDE/hay-bale-gardening-potatoesyoull-never-grow-potatoes-any-other-way-again-step-by-step-full-guide/

Posted by The Garden Prepper on Friday, April 7, 2017


Source:http://simplegoodandtasty.com

Farming Will Be Revolutionised By This Amazing Innovation!

Farming Will Be Revolutionised By This Amazing Innovation!

WHAT IS AQUAPONICS?

Are you wondering “what is aquaponics?” The most simple definition is that it is the marriage of aquaculture (raising fish) and hydroponics (the soil-less growing of plants) that grows fish and plants together in one integrated system. The fish waste provides an organic food source for the growing plants and the plants provide a natural filter for the water the fish live in. The third participants are the microbes (nitrifying bacteria) and composting red worms that thrive in the growing media. They do the job of converting the ammonia from the fish waste first into nitrites, then into nitrates and the solids into vermicompost that that are food for the plants.

In combining both systems aquaponics capitalizes on the benefits and eliminates the drawbacks of each.

The problems with traditional soil-based gardening

  • The weeds
  • The amount of water required
  • The soil-borne insects
  • The heavy digging, the bending, the back strain
  • The the bunnies, the raccoons, and other 4-legged pests
  • Knowledge required to know when to water, when and how to fertilize, and what is the composition of the soil

Farming Will Be Revolutionised By This Innovation!

A shining model of exceptional self-sufficiency, survival and ecological action is the Urban Homestead.Backyard Liberty (Easy and cheap DIY Aquaponic system to grow your organic and living food bank) Video Below

How aquaponics changes the game

  • Waist-high aquaponics gardening eliminates weeds, back strain and small animal access to your garden.
  • Reuse resources currently considered “waste”. In aquaponics there is no more toxic run-off from either hydroponics or aquaculture.
  • Aquaponics uses only 1/10th of the water of soil-based gardening, and even less water than hydroponics or recirculating aquaculture.
  • Watering is integral to an aquaponics system. You can’t under-water or over-water.
  • Fertilizing is also integral to an aquaponics system. You can’t over-fertilize or under-fertilize.
  • Gardening chores are cut down dramatically or eliminated. The aquaponics grower is able to focus on the enjoyable tasks of feeding the fish and tending and harvesting the plants.

Instead of using dirt or toxic chemical solutions to grow plants, aquaponics uses highly nutritious fish effluent that contains all the required nutrients for optimum plant growth. Instead of discharging water, aquaponics uses the plants and the media in which they grow to clean and purify the water, after which it is returned to the fish tank. This water can be reused indefinitely and will only need to be replaced when it is lost through transpiration and evaporation. Two primary methods of aquaponics growing are most widely in use today.

  • The raft based aquaponics growing system uses a foam raft that is floating in a channel filled with fish effluent water that has been through filtration to remove solid wastes. Plants are placed in holes in the raft and the roots dangle freely in the water. This method is most appropriate for growing salad greens and other fast growing, relatively low-nutrient plants.
  • The second method is called media based aquaponics because plants are grown in inert planting media (gravel, expanded clay pellets, coir, etc.).  The media provides both the biological (ammonia based waste) and mechanical (solid waste) filtration, so requires far less maintenance than raft-based systems.  Large, fruiting plants are also grown much more successfully in media based systems than in rafts.
  • The third method is called hybrid aquaponics, which is a combination of the two.  The media beds become the pre-filter for the solid waste before the water enters the raft systems.  This hybrid system style is the focus of The Aquaponic Source’s AquaBundance systems because it provides planting flexibility, high productivity and low maintenance.

The Lost Ways…a true story about our grandparents days!

Turn Back the Clock 150 Years:  The Lost Ways is an amazing program created to find out how our grand parents has survived in their crisis and they make us to learn the little secrets that helped them to survive in spite of almost everyone else dying. Now this is your chance to be part of saving our ancestors’ lost ways. Just I hope that there are more people like you and me who deeply believe that the best way to survive the next major crisis to look back at how people did things 150 years ago…..Watch this wonderful video


Source: YouTube

1 comment

EPIC DIY 2017:Chicken and Dill Instant Noodles Recipe-The Food Lab: Make Your Own Just-Add-Hot-Water Instant Noodles (and Make Your Coworkers Jealous)

EPIC DIY 2017:Chicken and Dill Instant Noodles Recipe-The Food Lab: Make Your Own Just-Add-Hot-Water Instant Noodles (and Make Your Coworkers Jealous)

These DIY instant noodle jars are packed with fresh ingredients and go from fridge to ready-to-eat in just 2 minutes with a kettle of boiling water.

Thinking back on it, I must have cooked more instant ramen than any other food in my life (with the exception, perhaps, of chocolate chip cookies). It’s what I cooked when I was home alone as a kid. It was a staple that took me through college. It’s what I make for myself when I come home too tipsy to do anything but boil water and knock back some aspirin. Its salty, potent broth has nursed me through countless hangovers.

To put it bluntly, instant noodles occupy a particularly warm, salty soft spot in my heart and I’d be willing to bet that this is the case for a large number of you out there as well.

But for all of its pleasure—the salty, MSG-packed broth, the little freeze-dried nubs of vegetables, the slippery, way-too-soft noodles—instant noodles, even the best of them, could never be considered healthy or satisfying in any form other than the basest. Wouldn’t it be great if you could get all of the convenience and pleasure of instant noodles—the portability, the just-add-water cooking, the lunch-sized portions—but pack it full of fresh vegetables and real, honest-to-goodness flavor?

Here’s a secret: you can, and it’s easier than you think.

I often get unduly excited by good food and clever ideas, even (or especially) when they aren’t my own. The original inspiration for this recipe came last week as I was unpacking one of my 37 boxes of cookbooks after my cross-country move. I accidentally dropped my prized signed copy of Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s River Cottage Veg and it flopped open to a page I must have just glossed over in the past. On that page Hugh has a recipe called DIY ‘Pot’ Noodles (what we call Cup Noodles or instant ramen over here).

The idea is simple and genius: combine par-cooked noodles, a bit of vegetable base, some raw sliced veggies, and a few seasonings inside a jar. Add boiling water, wait a few minutes, and you’ve got yourself a lunch with all the appeal of instant noodles, but with actual flavor and freshness trapped under that lid.

For the last couple weeks, I’ve taken that idea and run with it, experimenting with different types of noodles, different flavor combinations, different meats and vegetables, and different methods of storage, all with one goal in mind: to change the way you think about brown-bagging forever.

Today, I’m going to keep the talking to the minimum, walk you through one flavor—Spicy Kimchi Beef Flavor—give you basic instructions for the other three flavors—Chicken and Dill Flavor, Vegetable With Sesame-Miso Soup Flavor, and Thai Coconut Curry Shrimp Flavor—and leave you a few helpful tips for designing your own instant pot noodles because really, this is a method more than a strict recipe.

HOW TO MAKE SPICY KIMCHI BEEF FLAVOR INSTANT NOODLES

This pot of noodles is largely inspired by Shin Ramyun, the spicy Korean instant noodles flavored with kimchi and beef. We already have a full-fledged make-at-home recipe. Here’s a much faster, more portable version.

THE INGREDIENTS:

For this flavor we’re using beef base, shiitake mushrooms, beef jerky, kimchi, chili-garlic sauce, scallions, and noodles.

THE FLAVOR BASE:

Choosing a high quality flavor base is key here. You can use the powdered stuff, but you end up with a pot of noodles that doesn’t taste all that different from actual instant noodles. Better is to use a moist base made with a high proportion of real meat, like Better Than Bouillon. I use about a tablespoon (the soup also gets plenty of seasoning from the kimchi and chili-garlic sauce).

KIMCHI AND CHILI-GARLIC SAUCE:

I like to use old kimchi that is super sour for soups, along with plenty of its pickling liquid. Chili-garlic sauce adds heat and garlic (you can use as much or as little as you’d like).

SHIITAKE MUSHROOMS

Thinly sliced mushrooms get layered on next.

BEEF JERKY

I tried beef a few different ways, including raw slices (I disqualified them, as I made a rule of having no raw meats in order to increase the shelf life of the un-cooked jar), ground and pre-cooked, and pre-cooked and sliced. None worked particularly well in terms of balancing flavor with convenience. It wasn’t until I hit the checkout lane at the supermarket one day that I saw the solution staring at me: beef jerky.

I cut it into cubes and added it to the pot. As they soak in the boiling water, they reconstitute into something not like fresh meat, but entirely delicious in their own way. You can even get extra cheeky and use flavored jerkies (try teriyaki in here).

The beef gets cut into little squares and layered on top of the mushrooms.

READY FOR THE NOODLES

You should have a relatively dry top surface ready to receive the noodles now. The first few times I made these pots, I was layering ingredients—including wet ingredients—directly on top of the noodles, which ended up saturating them. Instead, it’s better to lay the wet down at the bottom, then add the noodles at the top. Even if they get shaken around a bit on your way to work, a couple of hours in contact with the wet ingredients won’t hurt them.

NOODLES

Add the noodles to the pot. A wide variety of noodles will work here, including pre-cooked ramen or pre-cooked Chinese-style egg noodles (both are generally available in Asian markets). If you can’t find pre-cooked wheat-based noodles, Thai or Vietnamese-style thin rice noodles (the kind you get in a bowl of pho) are available dry and will cook perfectly in the hot water.

If you’re willing to go through a little more effort, you can also par-cook fresh ramen or pasta in boiling water, drain it a moment or two before it is fully cooked, shock it under cold water, and toss it with a bit of oil before packing it into jars.

BUILD THE FLAVOR PACKET

The other big dilemma I had was that my fresh elements—my chopped herbs, sliced scallions, and other “finishing” flavors—were all getting soft and losing their brightness as they steeped in the boiling water. To solve this problem, I decided to store them separately in a zipper-lock bag.

REMOVE ALL THE AIR

Make sure to remove all the air by sealing it most of the way, rolling it up tight, then closing the seal.

TUCK IN THE FLAVOR PACK

Tuck the Flavor Pack* into the small space at the top of the jar.

*Patent pending!

SEAL AND STORE

Seal up the jar and store it in the refrigerator. Because all of the ingredients are either fresh vegetables, cooked noodles, dried meats, or very salty flavor bases, it has quite a long shelf life. I kept a few for over a week (the herbs suffer the most), but anywhere up to four days is when they’re at their best.

Once you take them out of the fridge, these pots should be safe to sit around at room temperature for up to around four hours (and probably way, way longer). If you have a mini-fridge at school or at the office, it doesn’t hurt to throw them in there though.

PACK IT FOR LUNCH AND ADD BOILING WATER

When you’re ready to eat it, open it up and set the Flavor Pack to the side. Add boiling water straight out of a desktop water kettle (or if you have a hot water dispenser nearby, that’ll work too; your local deli can probably give you some hot water out of the coffee machine).

CLOSE THE LID

Close the lid and seal it off. Now comes the hard part.

WAIT FOR IT…

Sit and wait for all the ingredients to reheat. If you’re anything like me, you’ll be peering into the sides of the jar like it’s the world’s coolest aquarium.

OPEN AND ADD FLAVOR PACK

Add the contents of the Flavor Pack to the top of the bowl and stir to combine, making sure to get all of the flavor base and juices from the bottom of the jar.

EAT

Eat your lunch and watch as your office-mates peer over the cubicle walls to see what the heck you’ve brought in today (feel free to send ’em this way to spread the love!).


Once Upon a Time in AmericaAre you ready to turn back the clocks to the 1800s for up to three years?Our grandfathers and great-grandfathers were the last generation to practice the basic things that we call survival skills now. ….Watch this video and you will find many interesting things!

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HOW TO MAKE CHICKEN AND DILL FLAVOR INSTANT NOODLES

This version starts with chicken meat I picked off of a rotisserie chicken from the supermarket, along with chicken base, sliced onions, frozen peas, and cooked noodles. The Flavor Pack gets filled with minced dill.

Frozen, finely cut vegetables work really nicely in these pots because they are generally par-cooked by blanching, which means that all they need to do is thaw in the hot water.

I don’t recommend pouring boiling water right next to your laptop like this, even if it is for a fully-staged “let’s pretend I’m at work” photo.*

*Come to think of it, since I work from home, I’m ALWAYS at work.

Yum. I also made a version of this using par-cooked egg noodles for a more traditional take on chicken noodle soup. It beat the pants off of the stuff from a can (duh).

HOW TO MAKE VEGETABLE WITH SESAME-MISO SOUP FLAVOR INSTANT NOODLES

This one is very similar to Hugh’s original recipe, though I’ve bumped up the flavor of the vegetable base with some grated ginger, miso paste, soy sauce, and sesame tahini. For the vegetables, I’m using a mix of julienned carrots, sliced shiitake mushrooms, and torn spinach.

The noodles in this batch are the pre-cooked Japanese ramen packs that come in ready-to-fry yakisoba kits.

For the Flavor Pack, I’m going with thinly sliced scallions as well as some pickled ginger to double up on that ginger flavor.

So good!

HOW TO MAKE THAI COCONUT CURRY SHRIMP FLAVOR INSTANT NOODLES

This is about as complicated as these get, and most of these ingredients are pantry staples (at least ’round my part they are).

The flavor starts with chicken base mixed with Thai red curry paste, some chili-garlic sauce (for extra heat), a dash of fish sauce, some brown sugar, and a bit of coconut milk. Cooked shrimp and thinly sliced mushrooms go on top, followed by a nest of rice vermicelli.

In the Flavor Pack, I use a mix of scallions and chopped cilantro, along with a wedge of lime to be squeezed into the soup after cooking.

This is probably my favorite flavor of all. It comes out really nicely balanced with hot, sour, and sweet flavors.

HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN FLAVORS!

It should be pretty obvious by now how the game is played, but here are some things I’ve learned in the past couple weeks:

THE JARS

You can use any type of heatproof resealable jar. A 1 pint mason jar would be a good choice. I got these little clamping jars with gaskets for 75¢ apiece at IKEA.

THE FLAVOR BASE

I’d never really used Better Than Bouillon in the past, but it was by far the best concentrated soup base I tried out of the half dozen or so I could find in the area. It makes sense—real meat and vegetables are high up on their ingredients lists, compared to most powdered bases which are primarily salt and MSG-like glutamates.

The key for really good flavor is to use the base as the background, bumping it up with other flavorful sauces and pastes. Miso paste, curry paste, and sesame tahini are three good ones. Any number of Chinese-style sauces like chili-garlic sauce, black bean sauce, or Sichuan chili bean paste work well. A touch of sugar can balance out heat. Freshly grated ginger and garlic will add freshness and bite. Soy sauce and fish sauce bring a powerful umami punch to a pot. Canned tomatoes or chipotle peppers are nice for a non-Asian flavor. Just make sure to scale back the soup base when you add other salty ingredients.

ADDING NOODLES

Rice noodles are the best choice

Don’t try and use uncooked ramen or Italian pasta—the water doesn’t stay hot long enough to cook them and they end up gummy and mushy!

  • The easiest noodles to use are the rice vermicelli sold under Thai and Vietnamese brands. Pad Thai-style wider rice noodles also work.
  • For wheat-based noodles, I recommend par-cooked noodles sold in the refrigerated sections of Asian supermarkets. Generally, these noodles are meant to be fried, so will be sold as fried lo mein or as yakisoba.
  • You can par-cook fresh or dried ramen, udon, soba, or Italian pasta. Cook it until slightly underdone, shock it in cold water, toss it with a little oil, and you’re good to go.
  • Shirataki and other no-cook noodle alternatives work well.

ADDING MEATS AND OTHER PROTEINS

Stick with fully cooked, cured, or dried meats. My favorites (and the easiest) are picked roast chicken, beef jerky, cooked shrimp, canned tuna, chunks of cured meats like chorizo or pepperoni, bacon (because it’s thin, bacon can actually be added raw and will cook in the boiling water), firm or fried tofu, smoked salmon, or finely flaked and rinsed salt cod.

ADDING VEGETABLES

The thing to remember is that nothing really cooks when you add the hot water. Things absorb water and can be slightly softened, but that’s it. Make sure you stick with vegetables that can be eaten raw. For firmer vegetables like carrots, cabbage, leeks, larger mushrooms, and the like, either grate the vegetables on the large holes of a box grater, or cut them into thin julienne-style matchsticks. More tender vegetables like mushrooms or tomatoes can be cut into bite-sized pieces. Leafy greens like kale and spinach should be freed of any thick, fibrous stems, if the have them, and then can be simply torn. Frozen vegetables like peas or corn can be added direct from the freezer, though if you plan on cooking the pots immediately, it’s best to thaw them under the tap first so that you don’t lose too much heat when you add your boiling water.

THE FLAVOR PACKS

This is where your fresh elements come in. Think fresh chopped herbs, citrus that can be juiced at the end, and pickled items like capers or ginger. Sliced chilies and scallions are also great.

Of course, you don’t have to limit yourself to Asian flavors just because real instant noodles usually do. The chicken and dill flavor above is great, but why even limit yourself to pasta? Some shredded chicken in a chicken base with drained canned beans, perhaps a bit of grated parmesan, some tomatoes, slivered beans and carrots, and torn kale all flavored with chopped rosemary and lemon zest in the Flavor Pack sounds pretty great to me, doesn’t it? Or what about a just-add-water version of the hot dog and sausage soup my mom used to make, perhaps upgraded with some smoked kielbasa, shredded cabbage, and carrots?

You get the point. There’s a lot of potential here. (Or as we say at my place now, *cup*tential.)*

*Ugh, just shoot me now for that terrible pun!

My Grandmother’s Recipe :How to make Pemmican, nature’s most perfect food !

Untitled

Source:http://www.seriouseats.com/

How To Easily Make A Beehive In A Jar DIY Project – A Step-by-Step Guide

How To Easily Make A Beehive In A Jar DIY Project – A Step-by-Step Guide

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If you want to start beekeeping but concerned about the space, don’t be. There are lots of solutions out there, you can even try my favorite, DIY mason jar beekeeping. You’ll just need a couple of supplies to get started, some wood, the bees, and you guessed it, mason jars! So scroll on and check out what the steps are so you can get started on beekeeping the easy way.

Materials Needed for your DIY Mason Jar Beekeeping:

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  • 1 – Piece of 2″ x 12″ x 6′ wood (cut 2 pieces for the sides to 22″)
  • 1 – Piece of 2″ x 12″ x 6′ wood (cut 2 pieces for the front and back to 18″)
  • 1 – Piece of 1″ x 1″ x 6′ wood (cut 2 pieces for the top frame left and right sides to 22″)
  • 1 – Piece of 1″ x 1″ x 6′ wood (cut 2 pieces for the top frame front and back to 18″)
  • 1 – Piece of thick plywood (cut to 16″ X 20″)
  • 1 – Bottom beehive kit (for the bees to enter and exit)
  • 12 – Big mouth quart sized mason jars (for honeycomb)
  • 1 – Box of wood screws (size 1″ screws)
  • 1 – Can of wood stain (use a dark wood stain of your choice)
  • And, lastly, your bees.

Step 1: Cut a piece of thick plywood to 16″ x 20″

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First get a piece of thick plywood and cut to 16″ x 20″.Then measure and center for 12 holes and drill the pilot holes.Next, drill 12 – 3 1/2″ holes with a hole saw (for the jars to fit into).

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Next cut 2 – 22″ pieces from a 2″ x 12″ x 6′ board and 2 – 18″ pieces from a 2″ x 12″ x 6′ board.
Then screw everything together and stain the wood with dark wood stain (or whatever you choose).


Once Upon a Time in America…Are you ready to turn back the clocks to the 1800s for up to three years?Our grandfathers and great-grandfathers were the last generation to practice the basic things that we call survival skills now. ….Watch this video and you will find many interesting things!

loost

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Get your 12 wide mouth mason 1/2 gallon size jars (or a normal quart sized jar).Then arrange them and make sure they all fit properly over the holes.

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Here is the 12 beehive jars arranged and installed in our backyard beehive.
The jars sit with the screw lid on for less than 1/16″ gap between the jar and the beehive hole.


ARTICLE-Amazing Invention:Honey on Tap Directly From Your Beehive Without Disturbing Bees


You may need to add some shims to support the weight so it won’t sag with the weight of the honey.

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Another view of our DIY backyard beehives in a jar project.You can vent and screen this chamber if there is excess heat or put the beehive where it gets late day shade.
The bottom wooden piece we purchased as a kit and this is where the bees enter and exit the beehive.

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The bees are seen here after we added them to the jars, they are now ready to make organic honey.

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After much time, here is what the honeycomb jars look like filled with honey.

The Best 3 Life Lessons We Learned From Our Grandparents. How far have they come? Survival Things We Lost To History!

lost ways

MORE QUESTIONS ABOUT BEES IN A JAR ? PLEASE WATCH THE VIDEO BELOW…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dl9iGjP_Lu4

generat

Sources:

DIY : How to Build a Magick Spiral Herb Garden

DIY : How to Build a Magick Spiral Herb Garden | Spiral Garden Design, Plants and Plans

Learn how to build a herb spiral in this article. A spiral herb garden is used for growing different herbs in a small space. With it, you ca.n make a perfect use of your vertical space in an arranged manner.
The principle of spiral herb garden is simple but functional.

A herb spiral is basically a small herb garden. It is three-dimensional and have beds in a confined, sloppy space of spiral shape, which can be used to grow various herbs. The top area of the spiral receives the full sun and has superior drainage, therefore, herbs that like exposure to the sun and good drainage are planted there. The bottom area of the spiral is suitable to grow herbs that require moist soil and less sun.

Herb spiral has spirally upward walls that are made of natural stones or bricks. The spiral shape is enlarged in contrast to the raised bed, the bed area has sufficient space to grow herbs and there are several zones with different soil characteristics and exposure to the sun.

The walls of herb spiral store solar heat and pass it at night back to the plant. Gabion walls look very attractive and are suitable for spiral herb gardens, too. At the foot of the herb spiral you can even make a mini pond, which will retain the moisture in the lower area, or if you want, you can create a  wetland where you can grow plants that love saturated soil.

Making a herb spiral is relatively cheap or almost free. It utilizes vertical space, which means you can grow more plants in small space. It also provides microclimates to different plants that mean you can grow more variety of plants. You can also make it on a concrete floor in your urban space.

How to Build a Herb Spiral

Build a herb spiral in a spot that receives at least 5 hours of sunlight daily. A sunny spot is good, but if you live in tropics choose an area that receives shade in the afternoon. You can also make herb spiral on a rooftop garden or on a large balcony or terrace.

Materials Required for a Spiral herb Garden

• Limestone and limestone rubble
• Soil
• Compost or aged manure
• Geotextile, pond liner or large container
• Gravel, crushed stones or wood chips for the driveway around the spiral
• Plants
• Working Tools: Spade, shovel, wheelbarrow, a stick, a rope and a measurement tape.

An 80-100 cm (0.8-1 m) high herb spiral should have a minimum diameter of 1.5-2 m.


RECOMMENDED : NEXT TIME IF YOU SEE THIS PLANT ON YOUR YARD, NEVER PULL IT OUT – HERE’S WHY!


How to Make a Herb Spiral

1. Decide where on the ground you’ll make a herb spiral. Plant a pole exactly at the center of that area and with the help of the measurement tape and rope, make a circle with a stick and then mark it with limestone.

2. Now erode the topsoil with the help of a shovel or spade to level the spot, also remove weeds and other debris.

3. If you want to create a pond or wetland at the foot of the spiral dig the soil more deeply at that point.

4. Before you lay the stones to make the wall, cover the excavation for the future pond with pond liner and around the spiral and its path with geotextile to prevent the weeds. If you don’t want to use geotextile, lay the cardboards. You can skip this step if you want.

5. Use the larger stones for the very bottom file of the spiral wall and smaller stones for the top. Keep the top layer of stones slightly inclined towards the interior.

6. Raise the row of layered stones and spiral up to a height of about 0.80 to 1 m. Always fill in the gaps with gravel or rubble. Also, at the center of the spiral, which is deepest, you can fill half of its depth with rubble or gravel.

7. Space for the plants to grow between the spirals should be, according to the amplitude of the spiral, ideally 30 to 50 cm.

8. Add a thin layer of crushed stone, gravel, wood chips or other materials in the base of your spiral bed where you’ll grow plants to cover the gap and improve drainage. At last, fill the spiral with soil and aged manure or compost. Once done, your spiral herb garden is ready for planting.

 

9. In the case of very large spirals, it could be difficult to collect herbs from the center without stepping on the bed so it is a good idea to lay the stones as footholds. For stability, it is important that the stones are placed with the smooth side down, and they are arranged staggered to avoid creating continuous joints.


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Easy Cellar program will also help your cherished ones whenever America crumbles into the ground. The author has shared 3 beneficial lessons which will certainly see to it your children. It will offer you everything that our predecessor’s secret means of surviving your precious one for the rest of your life. Easy Cellar system will certainly boost the high quality of your life quickly.


Herb Spiral Plans for Planting

Plan 1

Here we have provided you a plan for a small Mediterranean spiral herb garden: For this, you will need a warm and sunny place. You can easily adjust your choice of herbs according to your climate and amount of sun your herb spiral may receive.

Planting Example: 1 Thyme, 2 Oregano (Origanum vulgare), 3 Lavender, 4 Garlic chives (Allium tuberosum), 5 Yarrow, 6 Lemon balm (Melissa officinais), 7 Sage, 8 French tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus var. sativus), 9 Mint.

In a herb spiral, grow all the herbs you need for everyday cooking. The top of the herb spiral is a dry spot, which is ideal for the Mediterranean herbs such as lavender, sage, rosemary, or thyme. The middle circle of the spiral inhabits herbs that like slight moisture and requires the sun to thrive– cilantro, dill, lemon balm, lemon grass or chives. In the lower side, plant herbs that tolerate evenly moist soils and some shade such as mint, basil or parsley.

Plan 2

According to the plan 2, at the time of filling the soil in your spiral herb garden, bear in mind that this should be ideally divided into the four zones, each of which fades into the next without the continuity to give a different environment to your plants.

The area which is marked as A is on top of the spiral – Here you can grow Mediterranean or tropical herbs– Fill it with a light and loamy soil with the slight amount of sand.

In the second turn of the spiral, which is marked as B – Fill it with the soil that has some clay, also add a lot of compost to lighten it.

The lowest curve of the spiral, which is C– Fill it with rich potting soil and plenty of aged manure.

If you have not made a small water pond, then last is the swampy area D– Here add nutrient-rich soil so that you can grow here the plants that love wet soils.

Herb Spiral Plants

A

Rosemary (1), lavender (2), hyssop (3), Roman chamomile (4), sage (5), Oregano (6), savory (7), thyme (8), rui or (fake curry plant) helichrysum italicum (9).

B

Rocket (10), nasturtium (11), tarragon (or tarragon) (12), cilantro (13) Bishop’s weed (14), calendula (15), Marjoram (16 ), ginger (17).

C

Lemon balm (18), parsley (can not be close to chives), Bee balm (19) dill (20), garlic (21), chervil (22), chive (23), marshmallow (24), mint (25).

D

Meadowsweet (26), veronica beccabunga (27), watercress (28).

P = Stones to rest the feet.

Additional Tips for a Spiral Herb Garden

  • If you are making a pond, ensure the pond is facing North in Northern hemisphere and South in Southern hemisphere to reduce the evaporation of water.
  • Herbs that grow very tall, spread or expand in width should not be planted in the spiral herb garden because as they may suffocate the other plants.
  • Herbs like lovage, mint, borage, horseradish, artemisia, wormwood, and tansy or those that can become invasive, must be planted with care.
  • Plant the herb spiral in a way so that the tall plants will grow in the back. Otherwise, they will create the shade for the growing below in the spiral. Also, remember, that some herbs like mint are invasive and tend to spread. Therefore, it is better to plant them in a recessed bucket without a bottom.
  • With the herbs, you can also grow salad greens and edible flowers.

If you like, you can also grow flowers and other ornamental plants in your spiral herb garden.

DIY : How to Build a Magick Spiral Herb Garden | Spiral Garden Design, Plants and Plans/diy-how-to-build-a-magick-spiral-herb-garden-spiral-garden-design-plants-and-plans/

Posted by Patricia Irons on Wednesday, April 25, 2018

DIY Walipini:$300 UNDERGROUND GREENHOUSE GROWS FOOD YEAR ROUND; AN EXTRAORDINARY WALIPINI

DIY Walipini:$300 UNDERGROUND GREENHOUSE GROWS FOOD YEAR ROUND; AN EXTRAORDINARY WALIPINI

From vertical farms to solar-powered “farms from a box,” we’ve seen how farming technology has grown leaps and bounds in recent years. But for those who prefer something a little more rustic, growing food from a hole in the ground is as low-tech as you can get.

A walipini, meaning “place of warmth” from the Amaraya Indian language, is an underground greenhouse with a transparent (usually plastic) covering that stays warm by passively soaking up the sun’s heat and absorbing the earth’s thermal energy.

Fruits and vegetables can be grown year-round, making it ideal for communities in colder locations that can’t usually grow their own fresh and local produce during certain parts of the year.

The farming method isn’t exactly new. Walipinis have been used in South and Central America for decades, including one that can grow bananas at 14,000 feet in the Andes.

The technique was notably adopted by The Benson Institute, a worldwide food security program of the Mormon church. According to The Plaid Zebra, the Benson Institute and its team of volunteers built a community-sized 74-feet-by-20-feet walipini in La Paz, Bolivia for around a mere $300.


Editor’s Deal: DIY ROOT CELLAR  Easy Cellar Tom Griffith | Easy to Build Root Cellar in Your Own Back Yard  

Easy Cellar gives you the long-forgotten trick that has already aided our forefathers to make it through the famines, economics situations, wars, dry spells, diseases, and also anything else that life tossed at them. It is verified and also tested which has been developed by Tom Griffith.Video below

The institute published a DIY manual on how to build such a structure. It explains:

The Walipini, in simplest terms, is a rectangular hole in the ground 6 to 8 feet deep covered by plastic sheeting. The longest area of the rectangle faces the winter sun—to the north in the Southern Hemisphere and to the south in the Northern Hemisphere. A thick wall of rammed earth at the back of the building and a much lower wall at the front provide the needed angle for the plastic sheet roof.

This roof seals the hole, provides an insulating airspace between the two layers of plastic (a sheet on the top and another on the bottom of the roof/poles) and allows the suns rays to penetrate creating a warm, stable environment for plant growth.

Minneapolis-based Seasons Unity Project builds walipinis and says these structures can be constructed in places with surface temperatures as cold as -10 degrees Fahrenheit and as few as four feet below ground level.

“Of course, many climates are too harsh for growing healthy vegetables, fruits, and herbs outside year-round. Rather than stopping at the apparent challenge or obstacle… [the structure] allows its caretaker to harvest, store, and deliver energy without generation or requirement of external energy or active energy input,” the Seasons Unity Project said.

This 4-minute clip features a farmer from the Comanche community in Bolivia. He explains how a walipini helps grow crops, such as potatoes and quinoa, even during the frosty and rainy winter from December to February.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YN722I2eg7Q&ab_channel=BOLIVIAONGs

It’s a new system for us. We can rescue the heat, and with that heat we can make a good production and we also save water,” he says. “With a walipini…we can produce not only fodder (for animals), we can produce food for all the people who live here.

A walipini is also great for places like The Netherlands, which also cold weather spells. A volunteer farming group there called Creative Garden Wageningen is working on its own walipini, dubbed the Sunken Greenhouse that will house lemons, strawberries, peppers, and a variety of beans and herbs, as you can see in the video in the beginning of this article.


EXCLUSIVE:Do not be one of the people that freezes and is overcome by fear—You need to move smartly if you want to survive.How to make a Generator at home.


Impressively, the structure’s inside beam is a living willow tree. Additionally, the grounds outside have plots for plants such as beans, pumpkins, onions and more. The roof covering was made with donated landfill plastic.

“We made it ourselves for very little if no money at all using leftover and donated materials,” uploader Ben Green wrote.

He added that their walipini now has a reciprocal roof, “one of the few in the world to have such a roof.”

Interested in building your own underground greenhouse? Here are 5 things you should know:

Note: Cost of construction is relative. Supplies required are quite inexpensive. Many off gridders provide their own labor and are extensively resourceful. If you plan to throw money at it and see it built, a $300.00 solution isn’t for you. If you require a backhoe rental to dig, and someone to run it, the costs will be sizeably more.


 

DIY Adventure:How To Make a Vortex Fountain – The Homemade Vortex Water Fountain

DIY Adventure:How To Make a Vortex Fountain – The Homemade Vortex Water Fountain

Ever wanted a pet tornado? Well, it turns out that you can make a vortex fountain, to call your own, with a few components from your local hardware store.

OK, so it’s not strictly a tornado—but it’s still really cool. Wikipedia describes that:

A tornado is a violently rotating column of air that rotates while in contact with both the surface of the Earth and a cumulonimbus cloud or, in rare cases, the base of a cumulus cloud.

A vortex is described ‘as a region in a fluid in which the flow is rotating around an axis line, which may be straight or curved.’

UK water feature company, Tills, have designed a professionally crafted vortex fountain. It looks awesome, but it will set you back a hefty £1899.00 Plus VAT (in the UK), which is about $2500 !


The basic principle is fairly simple, though. Water is pumped into the cylinder, from the catchment area at the bottom, at a tangent—swirling the water into a vortex. The key point is that the water is pumped in faster than it eddies out—creating a stable vortex. Interestingly, if you disturb the vortex (as seen in the above video), water drains out faster, and the pump needs to catch up before the vortex is reestablished.

So, by using these mechanics, you can build your own pet vortex with cheaper materials and a small water pump. That’s exactly what meteorologist, Marshall McPeek, has done.


We’ve adapted their instructions for anyone looking for a little DIY adventure:

Materials and Tools:

  1. Acrylic jar
  2. Water pump with pipe/hose
  3. Sandpaper
  4. Power drill, with drill bits
  5. Sealant gun, with silicone sealant
  6. Epoxy resin (optional)
  7. Acrylic sheet
  8. Acrylic solvent
  9. Screws
  10. Screwdriver
  11. Base

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Instructions:

  1. Remove the jar’s top rim bead, so that it has flat edges.
  2. Wet sand the outside of the jar (this helps the water ‘glide’ down the side).
  3. Drill a hole in the center of the jar’s base (see next section on design pointers for sizing).
  4. Drill a hole on the side of the jar’s base (match the size with the tubing that connects to the pump). The hole needs to be drilled at a tangent to the side so that the water will pump in and hit the wall to create a circular motion.
  5. Use a sealant gun and/or epoxy resin to attach the hose to the jar (at the drill point specified in step 4).
  6. Use an acrylic solvent to glue a piece of acrylic sheet to the bottom of the jar, so that it screws onto the base (this can be a water-tight box/bucket or other suitable container).
  7. Drill holes in the acrylic sheet to let water drain through into the base catchment area.

Design Pointers:

  1. The diameter, height, drain hole size, and input hole size all affect the flow rate, which determines how much water you need. altech6983 recommends starting with a small drain hole and gradually making it larger until you hit the sweet-spot.
  2. The bottom container has to have enough water in it to fully emerge the pump when the fountain is running.
  3. The bottom container must be big enough to hold the water that is in the acrylic jar.
  4. The water dropping back into the catchment area is pretty loud. altech6983 suggests using some window mesh under the acrylic sheet to help silence it.
  5. The fountain must be perfectly level (or as close to level as possible).
  6. Anything that reduces the surface tension of water is a great addition. altech6983 uses a drop of dishwashing liquid.

If you decide to have a go at creating your own pet vortex, we’d love to see the results in the comments below.


The Lost Ways…a true story about our grandparents days!

Turn Back the Clock 150 Years:  The Lost Ways is an amazing program created to find out how our grand parents has survived in their crisis and they make us to learn the little secrets that helped them to survive in spite of almost everyone else dying. Now this is your chance to be part of saving our ancestors’ lost ways. Just I hope that there are more people like you and me who deeply believe that the best way to survive the next major crisis to look back at how people did things 150 years ago…..Watch this wonderful video

Source:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cI9QKvk9Fs4  http://www.adaptnetwork.com   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xLyT907F83I&feature=youtu.be 

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DIY Garden Projects and Ideas for The Perfect Backyard-Recycle Tire Planter – Under $80.00

DIY Garden Projects and Ideas for The Perfect Backyard-Recycle Tire Planter – Under $80.00

Many of us just love garden projects. They require lots of work and creativity but give you a good reason for spending the weekends with family outside in your beautiful backyard. Designing this kind of area is usually hard and time consuming but you don’t need to do everything at the same time.

I have gathered a collection of inspirational DIY garden projects that will make a big difference in your garden or outdoor area. Whether your garden needs a complete transformation or new planting, garden projects for outdoor area is always fun.

I saw the same photo on Pinterest that everyone else saw… you know the one with flowers flowing out of some colorful tires.  I knew I had to do it! I had five tires in my garage ironically enough, and after searching a friends place I found some smaller cute ones.

I laid out the tires in the spot where I had pulled up a long above ground vegetable box.  I went to Lowe’s and bought some spray paint (actually made two trips, as I forgot the all important pink & orange!). 

What had me in a quandary for about a week, was what & how was I going to keep and hold the dirt in the tires without having to use a lot of soil, and just in the off case I might want to move them one day.  I knew that something would come to me, but in the mean time I needed to get the painting started!

We played around with the design & color combinations for a few days until we finally come up with what we thought we wanted to do.  Still had to come up with a way to hold the dirt in the tires without using a ton of soil.  I searched around on Pinterest until I saw a photo on how to make a vertical planter.

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They used burlap or plastic backing, but I wanted to use something I already had, as I was trying very hard to stay within the recycle, reuse or up-cycle mode & wanted to keep the project as cheap as possible!  At this point I had spent $40 bucks on paint! That’s when it hit me that I have plenty of bags that hold the duck’s corn!  They are a plastic burlap bag of sorts, and would be just….Perfect!  We gathered all the tools we thought we would need our for the project. 

Our morning started with Lemon trying to help us straighten out the burlap bags so we could cut them open. We just laid the bags over the tires and cut enough to cover the holes.  My first thought was to just staple the bags on the bottom of the tires and fill then up.  After a few minutes of consideration we felt that would be fine for the ones laying on the ground, but the ones on the upper levels we would have to come up with a support system. 

We had a few pallets laying around (yes that’s another project taking place), so we pulled a few boards off one of the pallets to help with the support of the dirt.  I did not want the dirt to lay on the boards, as they would deteriorate & the dirt would fall through from the weight of the soil.  So we cut out three boards per tire and stapled the them onto the bag and inverted them into the tires.  This way the plastic burlap bag would hold the dirt & protect the wood slates, while the wood slates would help support the dirt in the tires.

Now we needed to drill some more hole in the tires for drainage, and tacked down the plastic bag inside the tire until they could be filled with dirt.

We placed the tires back out onto the ground, when we realized we could not remember what the original arraignment looked like!  We played with the colors again, while looking at the photos I had taken.  Pull this one here and pull that one there.  That’s when we had the thought to turn the smaller pink tire on its side.  Hey that looks great, but I think it needs another small tire.


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I quickly break out the paint can and painted a small blue tire.  Once the pink tire was turned on it’s side it showed the fence and needed something… something to hide the fence.  I started for the garage we found an old temperature dial off the fence that has not worked for over a year, and I had never thrown away. By George it fit perfectly.  Grabbed the gorilla glue and 30 minutes later it was ready to go!  We commenced in filling in the tires with top soil and then topped it off with the better garden soil. Finishing off with some plants and added some bedding flower seeds for additional flowers to come up………..

Voila!
Supplies Used:
9 – Used Tires 
5 – Plastic Burlap Feed Bags 
10 – 40 lbs. Bags of Cheap Top Soil @ $1.35 per bag**
1 – 40 lbs. Bag of Garden Soil @ $4.50
7 – Can of Spray Paint @ $4.95 per can
8 – Plants @ $25.00
4 – Plants from the Garden 
1 – Pack Seeds @ $1.00
1 – Old Pallet 
1 – Hammer
1 – Saw 
1 – Staple Gun with 5/18 staples
1 – Drill with 5/18 drill
1 – Scissors
1 – Tube of Gorilla Glue
1- Used Temperature Dial
1 – Pug Helper

Total Project Cost 
$78.65 
**Instead of field dirt to keep the tires from being so heavy, use empty water bottle to fill in the sides**


The Hogan Cellar-VIDEOThe hogans of old are also considered pioneers of energyefficient homes: Using packed mud against the entire wood structure, the home was kept cool by natural air ventilation and water sprinkled on the dirt ground inside. During the winter, the fireplace kept the inside warm for a long period of time and well into the night. This concept is called thermal mass.”

DIY Garden Projects and Ideas for The Perfect Backyard-Recycle Tire Planter – Under $80.00Instruction Here:/diy-garden-projects-ideas-perfect-backyard-recycle-tire-planter-80-00/

Posted by The Garden Prepper on Saturday, July 8, 2017


Build a $300 Underground Greenhouse For Year-Round Gardening.Extra Bonuses:3 Easy DIY Greenhouses for Under $300 [video]

Build a $300 Underground Greenhouse For Year-Round Gardening.Extra Bonuses:3 Easy DIY Greenhouses for Under $300

This low-tech technology is a true gift from mother nature.For as little as $300 you can create an underground greenhouse that will provide enough food to live on year-round.

Growers in colder climates often utilize various approaches to extend the growing season or to give their crops a boost, whether it’s coldframes, hoop houses or greenhouses.

Greenhouses are usually glazed structures, but are typically expensive to construct and heat throughout the winter. A much more affordable and effective alternative to glass greenhouses is thewalipini (an Aymara Indian word for a “place of warmth”), also known as an underground or pit greenhouse. First developed over 20 years ago for the cold mountainous regions of South America, this method allows growers to maintain a productive garden year-round, even in the coldest of climates.

Here’s a video tour of a walipini that shows what a basic version of this earth-sheltered solar greenhouse looks like inside

 

It’s a pretty intriguing set-up that combines the principles of passive solar heating with earth-sheltered building. But how to make one? From American sustainable agriculture non-profit Benson Institute comes this enlightening manual on how a walipini works, and how to build it:

-the Walipini utilizes nature’s resources to provide a warm, stable, well-lit environment for year-round vegetable production. Locating the growing area 6’- 8’ underground and capturing and storing daytime solar radiation are the most important principles in building a successful Walipini.

The Walipini, in simplest terms, is a rectangular hole in the ground 6 ‛ to 8’ deep covered by plastic sheeting. The longest area of the rectangle faces the winter sun — to the north in the Southern Hemisphere and to the south in the Northern Hemisphere.

 

A thick wall of rammed earth at the back of the building and a much lower wall at the front provide the needed angle for the plastic sheet roof. This roof seals the hole, provides an insulating airspace between the two layers of plastic (a sheet on the top and another on the bottom of the roof/poles) and allows the sun’s rays to penetrate creating a warm, stable environment for plant growth.

This earth-sheltered greenhouse taps into the thermal mass of the earth, so that much less energy is needed to heat up the walipini’s interior than an aboveground greenhouse. Of course, there are precautions to take in waterproofing, drainage and ventilating the walipini, while aligning it properly to the sun — which the manual covers in detail.

Best of all, according to the Benson Institute, their 20-foot by 74-foot walipni field model out in La Paz cost around $250 to $300 only, thanks to the use of free labour provided by owners and neighbours, and the use of cheaper materials like plastic ultraviolet (UV) protective sheeting and PVC piping.

Fruits and vegetables can be grown year-round, making it ideal for communities in colder locations that can’t usually grow their own fresh and local produce during certain parts of the year.

This type of farming method isn’t exactly new, Walipinis have been used in South and Central America for decades, including one that can grow bananas at 14,000 feet in the Andes.

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Growers in colder climates often utilize various approaches to extend the growing season or to give their crops a boost, whether it’s coldframes, hoop houses or greenhouses.

Greenhouses are usually glazed structures, but are typically expensive to construct and heat throughout the winter. A much more affordable and effective alternative to glass greenhouses is the walipini (an Aymara Indian word for a “place of warmth”), also known as an underground or pit greenhouse. First developed over 20 years ago for the cold mountainous regions of South America, this method allows growers to maintain a productive garden year-round, even in the coldest of climates.

The institute published a DIY manual on how to build such a structure. It explains:

The Walipini, in simplest terms, is a rectangular hole in the ground 6 to 8 feet deep covered by plastic sheeting. The longest area of the rectangle faces the winter sun—to the north in the Southern Hemisphere and to the south in the Northern Hemisphere. A thick wall of rammed earth at the back of the building and a much lower wall at the front provide the needed angle for the plastic sheet roof. This roof seals the hole, provides an insulating airspace between the two layers of plastic (a sheet on the top and another on the bottom of the roof/poles) and allows the suns rays to penetrate creating a warm, stable environment for plant growth.

Minneapolis-based Seasons Unity Project builds walipinis and says these structures can be constructed in places with surface temperatures as cold as -10 degrees Fahrenheit and as few as four feet below ground level.

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It’s a pretty intriguing set-up that combines the principles of passive solar heating with earth-sheltered building. But how to make one? From American sustainable agriculture non-profit Benson Institute comes this enlightening manual on how a walipini works, and how to build it.

Build a $300 Underground Greenhouse For Year-Round Gardening.INSTRUCTIONS HERE:/build-300-underground-greenhouse-year-round-gardening/

Posted by The Garden Prepper on Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Extra Bonuses:3 Easy DIY Greenhouses for Under $300

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It’s seed-starting season and spring is just around the corner. If you’re looking to start seeds indoors and realize that you don’t have enough windows space to sprout seeds indoors, or don’t want to raise your electrical bill by installing grow lights, building a greenhouse from recycled and salvaged items might be the solution you need.

1. The Window Frame Greenhouse

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Probably the most popular examples of DIY greenhouses you’ll find on the Internet. This greenhouse by Angela Davis of My Rubber Boots uses old wooden windows that you can pick up at the local dump, architectural salvage store, yard sale, or even in your alley.

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The best time to salvage windows for this garden project is during construction and remodeling season where you live. Take Angela’s awesome photo tour of her window greenhouse and garden.

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Here’s another window frame greenhouse, this one by Michael Taeuber, who created an Instructable to demonstrate how to build a greenhouse from old windows for his plants.

2. The Lean-to Greenhouse

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Alex Campbell built this lean-to greenhouse, also using old windows, for his food  operation.

He graciously documented his project so others could follow along and do the same. One of the benefits of building a lean-to greenhouse is that you can passively heat it during the cold with heat from the structure it is attached to.

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3. The Poly Hoop House

1

Here’s a simple greenhouse that you can build in one weekend.

You’ll need a few pieces of lumber, a polyurethane sheet, and some “cattle panels” for support. Charlie Lybrand followed Adam Fyall’s directions for building a poly greenhouse. The temporary and portable nature of this example makes it a great option for gardeners who are renting or want to take advantage of the passive solar heating.

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How North American Indians and Early Pioneers Made Pemmican?Watch this video and you will find many interesting things!

Source:http://www.treehugger.com

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Best 100 + Old-Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs! Part.1

Best 100 + Old-Time Recipes for Home Made Wines Cordials and Liqueurs! Part.1

Old-Time Recipes for Home Made Wines

The idea of compiling this little volume occurred to me while on a visit to some friends at their summer home in a quaint New England village. The little town had once been a thriving seaport, but now consisted of hardly more than a dozen old-fashioned Colonial houses facing each other along one broad, well-kept street. A few blind lanes led to less pretentious homes; and still farther back farmhouses dotted the landscape and broke the dead line of the horizon.

The best method of making these wines is to boil the ingredients, and ferment with yeast. Boiling makes the wine more soft and mellow. Some, however, mix the juice, or juice and fruit, with sugar and water unboiled, and leave the ingredients to ferment spontaneously. Your fruit should always be prime, and gathered dry, and picked clean from stalks, etc. The lees of wine are valuable for distillation, or making vinegar. When wine is put in the cask the fermentation will be renewed. Clear away the yeast as it rises, and fill up with wine, for which purpose a small quantity should be reserved. If brandy is to be added, it must be when the fermentation has nearly subsided, that is, when no more yeast is thrown up at the bung-hole, and when the hissing noise is not very perceptible; then mix a quart of brandy with a pound of honey, pour into the cask, and paste stiff brown paper over the bung-hole. Allow no hole for a vent peg, lest it should once be forgotten, and the whole cask of wine be spoiled. If the wine wants vent it will be sure to burst the paper; if not the paper will sufficiently exclude the air. Once a week or so it may be looked to; if the paper is burst, renew it, and continue to do so until it remains clear and dry.

A great difference of opinion prevails as to racking the wine, or suffering it to remain on the lees. Those who adopt the former plan do it at the end of six months; draw off the wine perfectly clear, and put it into a fresh cask, in which it is to remain six months, and then be bottled. If this plan is adopted, it may be better, instead of putting the brandy and honey in the first cask, to put it in that in which the wine is to be racked; but on the whole, it is, perhaps, preferable to leave the wine a year in the first cask, and then bottle it at once.

All British wines improve in the cask more than in the bottle. Have very nice clear and dry bottles; do not fill them too high. Good soft corks, made supple by soaking in a little of the wine; press them in, but do not knock. Keep the bottles lying in sawdust. This plan will apply equally well to raspberries, cherries, mulberries, and all kinds of ripe summer fruits.

COLORING FOR WINES

One pound of white sugar. Put into an iron kettle, let boil, and burn to a red black, and thick; remove from the fire, and add a little hot water, to keep it from hardening as it cools; then bottle for use.

FINING OR CLEARING

For fining or clearing the wine use one quarter pound of isinglass, dissolved in a portion of the wine, to a barrel. This must be put in after the fermentation is over, and should be added gently at the bung-hole, and managed so as to spread as much as possible over the upper surface of the liquid; the intention being that the isinglass should unite with impurities and carry them with it to the bottom.

TO FLAVOR WINE

When the vinous fermentation is about half-over, the flavoring ingredients are to be put into the vat and well stirred into the contents. If almonds form a component part, they are first to be beaten to a paste and mixed with a pint or two of the must. Nutmegs, cinnamon, ginger, seeds, etc., should, before they are put into the vat, be reduced to powder, and mixed with some of the must.

TO MELLOW WINE

Wine, either in bottle or wood, will mellow much quicker when only covered with pieces of bladder well secured, than with corks or bungs. The bladder allows the watery particles to escape, but is impervious to alcohol.

TO REMOVE THE TASTE OF THE CASK FROM WINE

Finest oil of olives, one pound. Put it into the hogshead, bung close, and roll it about, or otherwise well agitate it, for three or four hours, then gib, and allow it to settle. The olive oil will gradually rise to the top and carry the ill flavor with it.

TO REMOVE ROPINESS FROM WINE

Add a little catechu or a small quantity of the bruised berries of the mountain ash.

TO RESTORE WINE WHEN SOUR OR SHARP

1. Fill a bag with leek-seed, or of leaves or twisters of vine, and put either of them to infuse in the cask.

2. Put a small quantity of powdered charcoal in the wine, shake it, and after it has remained still for forty-eight hours, decant steadily.


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TO MAKE APPLE WINE

To every gallon of apple juice, immediately as it comes from the press, add two pounds of common loaf sugar; boil it as long as any scum rises, then strain it through a sieve, and let it cool. Add some good yeast, and stir it well. Let it work in the tub for two or three weeks, or till the head begins to flatten; then skim off the head, drain it clear off and tun it. When made a year, rack it off and fine it with isinglass; then add one-half pint of the best rectified spirit of wine or a pint of French brandy to every eight gallons.

APRICOCK WINE

Take three pounds of sugar, and three quarts of water; let them boil together and skim it well. Then put in six pounds of apricocks, pared and stoned, and let them boil until they are tender; then take them up and when the liquor is cold bottle it up. You may if you please, after you have taken out the apricocks, let the liquor have one boil with a sprig of flowered clary in it; the apricocks make marmalade, and are very good for preserves.

BALM WINE

Take ten pounds of sugar, six quarts of water, boil it gently for two hours; skim it well and put it into a tub to cool. Take three-quarters pound of the tops of balm, bruise them, and put them into a barrel with a little new yeast, and when the liquor is cold, pour it on the balm. Stir it well together, and let it stand twenty-four hours, stirring it often. Then close it up and let it stand six weeks. Then rack it off and put a lump of sugar into every bottle. Cork it well, and it will be better the second year than the first.

TO MAKE BARLEY WINE

Take one-half pound of French barley and boil it in three waters, and save three pints of the last water, and mix it with one quart of white wine, one-half pint of borage water, as much clary water, a little red rose-water, the juice of five or six lemons, three-quarters pound of fine sugar, the thin yellow rind of a lemon. Brew all these quick together, run it through a strainer, and bottle it up. It is pleasant in hot weather, and very good in fevers.

TO MAKE BEER AND ALE FROM PEA-SHELLS

Fill a boiler with green shells of peas, pour on water till it rises half an inch above the shells, and simmer for three hours. Strain off the liquor, and add a strong decoction of wood-sage, or hops, so as to render it pleasantly bitter; ferment with yeast, and bottle.

BIRCH WINE

The liquor of the birch-tree is to be obtained in the month of March, when the sap begins to ascend. One foot from the ground bore a hole in each tree, large enough to admit a faucet, and set a vessel under; the liquor will run for two or three days without hurting the tree. Having obtained a sufficient quantity, stop the holes with pegs. To each gallon of the liquor add one quart of honey, or two and one-half pounds of sugar. Boil together one hour, stirring it well. A few cloves may be added for flavor, or the rind of a lemon or two; and by all means one ounce of hops to four and one-half gallons of wine.

Work it with yeast, tun, and refine with isinglass. Two months after making, it may be drawn off and bottled, and in two months more will be fit for use, but will improve by keeping.

BLACKBERRY WINE

Bruise the berries well with the hands. To one gallon of fruit, add one-half gallon of water, and let stand overnight. Strain and measure, and to each gallon of juice add two and one-half pounds of sugar. Put in cask and let ferment. Tack thin muslin over top, and when fermentation stops, pour into jugs or kegs. Wine keeps best in kegs.

BLACKBERRY WINE
(other methods of making)

1. Having procured berries that are fully ripe, put them into a tub or pan with a tap to it, and pour upon them as much boiling water as will just cover them. As soon as the heat will permit the hand to be put into the vessel, bruise them well till all the berries are broken. Then let them stand covered till the berries begin to rise toward the top, which they usually do in three or four days. Then draw off the clear liquor into another vessel, and add to every ten quarts of this liquor four pounds of sugar. Stir it well, and let it stand to work a week or ten days; then filter it through a flannel jelly-bag into a cask. Take now four ounces of isinglass and lay it to steep for twelve hours in one pint of blackberry juice. The next morning boil it over a slow fire for one-half hour with one quart or three pints more juice, and pour it into the cask. When cool, rouse it well, and leave it to settle for a few days, then rack it off into a clean cask, and bung it down.

2. The following is said to be an excellent recipe for the manufacture of a superior wine from blackberries: Measure your berries, and bruise them; to every gallon, add one quart of boiling water. Let the mixture stand twenty-four hours, stirring occasionally; then strain off the liquor into a cask, to every gallon adding two pounds of sugar. Cork tight and let stand till the following October, and you will have wine ready for use, without any further straining or boiling, that will make lips smack, as they never smacked under similar influence before.

3. Gather when ripe, on a dry day. Put into a vessel, with the head out, and a tap fitted near the bottom; pour on them boiling water to cover them. Mash the berries with your hands, and let them stand covered till the pulp rises to the top and forms a crust, in three or four days. Then draw off the fluid into another vessel, and to every gallon add one pound of sugar. Mix well, and put into a cask, to work for a week or ten days, and throw off any remaining lees, keeping the cask well filled, particularly at the commencement. When the working has ceased, bung it down; after six to twelve months, it may be bottled.

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FINE BRANDY SHRUB

Take one ounce of citric acid, one pint of porter, one and one-half pints of raisin wine, one gill of orange-flower water, one gallon of good brandy, two and one-quarter quarts of water. First, dissolve the citric acid in the water, then add to it the brandy; next, mix the raisin wine, porter, and orange-flower water together; and lastly, mix the whole, and in a week or ten days it will be ready for drinking and of a very mellow flavor.

AMERICAN CHAMPAGNE

Seven quarts good cider (crab-apple cider is the best), one pint best fourth-proof brandy, one quart genuine champagne wine, one quart milk, one-half ounce of bitartrate of potassa. Mix and let stand a short time; bottle while fermenting. An excellent imitation.

CHAMPAGNE CUP

To two ounces of powdered loaf sugar, put the juice and rind of one lemon pared thin; pour over these a large glass of dry sherry, and let it stand for an hour; then add one bottle of sparkling champagne and one bottle of soda water, a thin slice of fresh cucumber with the rind on, a sprig of borage or balm, and pour on blocks of clear ice.

BRITISH CHAMPAGNE

To every five pounds of rhubarb, when sliced and bruised, put one gallon of cold spring water. Let it stand three days, stirring two or three times every day; then press and strain it through a sieve, and to every gallon of liquor, put three and one-half pounds of loaf sugar. Stir it well, and when melted, barrel it. When it has done working, bung it up close, first suspending a muslin bag with isinglass from the bung into the barrel. To eight gallons of liquor, put two ounces of isinglass. In six months bottle it and wire the bottles; let them stand up for the first month, then lay four or five down lengthways for a week, and if none burst, all may be laid down. Should a large quantity be made, it must remain longer in cask. It may be colored pink by putting in a quart of raspberry juice. It will keep for many years.

BURGUNDY CHAMPAGNE

Fourteen pounds loaf sugar, twelve pounds brown sugar (pale), ten gallons warm water, one ounce white tartar. Mix, and at a proper temperature add one pint yeast. Afterwards, add one gallon sweet cider, two or three bitter almonds (bruised), one quart pale spirit, one-eighth ounce orris powder.

CHAMPAGNE CIDER

Champagne cider is made as follows: To five gallons of good cider put three pints of strained honey, or one and one-eighth pounds of good white sugar. Stir well and set it aside for a week. Clarify the cider with one-half gill of skimmed milk, or one teaspoonful of dissolved isinglass, and add one and one-half pints of pure spirits. After two or three days bottle the clear cider, and it will become sparkling. In order to produce a slow fermentation, the casks containing the fermenting liquor must be bunged up tight. It is a great object to retain much of the carbonic gas in the cider, so as to develop itself after being bottled.

CHAMPAGNE CIDER, NO. 2

One hogshead good pale vinous cider, three gallons proof spirit (pale), fourteen pounds honey or sugar. Mix, and let them remain together in a temperate situation for one month; then add one quart orange-flower water, and fine it down with one-half gallon skimmed milk. This will be very pale; and a similar article, when bottled in champagne bottles, silvered and labelled, has been often sold to the ignorant for champagne. It opens very brisk, if managed properly.

 

TO MAKE ENGLISH CHAMPAGNE, OR THE FINE CURRANT WINE

Take to three gallons of water nine pounds of Lisbon sugar; boil the water and sugar one-half hour, skim it clean. Then have one gallon of currants picked, but not bruised. Pour the liquor boiling hot over them, and when cold, work it with one-half pint of balm two days; then pour it through a flannel or sieve; then put it into a barrel fit for it, with one-half ounce of isinglass well bruised. When it has done working, stop it close for a month. Then bottle it, and in every bottle put a very small lump of double refined sugar. This is excellent wine, and has a beautiful color.

SHAM CHAMPAGNE

One lemon sliced, one tablespoon tartaric acid, one ounce of race-ginger, one and one-half pounds sugar, two and one-half gallons of boiling water poured on the above. When blood warm, add one gill of distillery yeast, or two gills of home-brewed. Let it stand in the sun through the day. When cold, in the evening, bottle, cork, and wire it. In two days it is ready for use.

CHEAP AND AGREEABLE TABLE BEER

Take four and one-half gallons of water and boil one half, putting the other into a barrel; add the boiling water to the cold with one quart of molasses and a little yeast. Keep the bung-hole open until fermentation ceases.

CHERRY BOUNCE

Four quarts of wild cherries stemmed and well washed, four quarts of water. (I put mine in a big yellow bowl, and cover with double cheese-cloth, and set behind the kitchen stove for two weeks.) Skim every few days. Then strain, add three-quarters pound sugar to each quart of liquid, and let ferment again. This takes about two weeks. When it stops working, add rum,—about two bottles full for this quantity. (It is good without any rum.)

CHERRY BOUNCE, NO. 2

One quart of rum to one quart of wild cherries, and three-quarters pound of sugar. Put into a jug, and at first give it a frequent shake. Let it stand for several months before you pour off and bottle. A little water put on to the cherries left in the jug will make a pleasant and less ardent drink.

CHERRY BOUNCE, NO. 3

One gallon of good whiskey, one and one-half pints of wild black cherries bruised so as to break the stones, two ounces of common almonds shelled, two ounces of white sugar, one-half teaspoonful cinnamon, one-quarter teaspoonful cloves, one-quarter teaspoonful nutmeg, all bruised. Let stand twelve to thirteen days, and draw off. This, with the addition of one-half gallon of brandy, makes very nice cherry bounce.

TO MAKE CHERRY WINE

Pull off the stalks of the cherries, and mash them without breaking the stones; then press them hard through a hair bag, and to every gallon of liquor, put two pounds of sugar. The vessel must be full, and let it work as long as it makes a noise in the vessel; then stop it up close for a month or more, and when it is fine, draw it into dry bottles, and put a lump of sugar into every bottle. If it makes them fly, open them all for a moment, and then stop them up again. It will be fit to drink in a quarter of a year.

CHERRY WINE, NO. 2

Fifteen pounds of cherries, two pounds of currants. Bruise them together. Mix with them two-thirds of the kernels, and put the whole of the cherries, currants, and kernels into a barrel, with one-quarter pound of sugar to every pint of juice. The barrel must be quite full. Cover the barrel with vine leaves, and sand above them, and let it stand until it has done working, which will be in about three weeks; then stop it with a bung, and in two months’ time it may be bottled.

2. Gather the cherries when quite ripe. Pull them from their stalks, and press them through a hair sieve. To every gallon of the liquor add two pounds of lump sugar finely beaten; stir all together, and put it into a vessel that will just hold it. When it has done fermenting, stop it very close for three months, and then bottle it off for use.

GENERAL RULES FOR MAKING CIDER

Always choose perfectly ripe and sound fruit. Pick the apples by hand. (An active boy with the bag slung over his shoulder will soon clear a tree. Apples that have lain any time on the soil contract an earthy taste, which will always be found in the cider.)

After sweating, and before being ground, wipe them dry, and if any are found bruised or rotten, put them in a heap by themselves, for an inferior cider to make vinegar.

Always use hair cloths, instead of straw, to place between the layers of pomace. The straw when heated, gives a disagreeable taste to the cider.

As the cider runs from the press, let it pass through a hair sieve into a large open vessel that will hold as much juice as can be expressed in one day. In a day, or sometimes less, the pomace will rise to the top, and in a short time grow very thick. When little white bubbles break through it, draw off the liquor by a spigot, placed about three inches from the bottom, so that the lees may be left quietly behind.

The cider must be drawn off into very clean, sweet casks and closely watched. The moment the white bubbles before mentioned are perceived rising at the bung-hole, rack it again. When the fermentation is completely at an end, fill up the cask with cider, in all respects like that already contained in it, and bung it up tight, previous to which a tumbler of sweet oil may be poured into the bung-hole.

After being made and barrelled it should be allowed to ferment until it acquires the desired flavor, for perfectly sweet cider is not desirable. In the meantime clean barrels for its reception should be prepared thus: Some clean strips of rag are dipped into melted sulphur, lighted and hung in the bung-hole, and the bung laid loosely on the end of the rag. This is to allow the sulphur vapor to well fill the barrel. Tie up a half-pint of mustard-seed in a coarse muslin rag and put it into the barrel, then put your cider in. Now add the isinglass, which “fines” the cider but does not help to keep it sweet. This is the old-fashioned way, and will keep cider in the same condition as it went into the barrel, if kept in a cool place, for a year.

The sulphur vapor checks the fermentation, and the sulphur in the mustard-seed keeps it checked. We hear that professional cider dealers are now using the bisulphite of lime instead of the mustard-seed and the sulphur vapor. This bisulphite of lime is the same as the “preserving powder.” It is only another form of using the sulphur, but it is more convenient and perhaps more effectual. Another method is to add sugar, one and a half pounds sugar to a gallon of the cider, and let it ferment. This makes a fermented, clear, good cider, but sweet. It lasts sweet about six months, if kept in a cool situation.

Preparatory to bottling cider it should be examined, to see whether it be clear and sparkling. If not, it should be clarified in a similar way to beer, and left for a fortnight. The night before it is intended to put it Into bottles, the bung should be taken out of the cask, and left so until the next day, when it may be bottled, but not corked down until the day after, as, if this be done at once, many of the bottles will burst by keeping. The best corks and champagne bottles should be used, and it is usual to wire and cover the corks with tinfoil, after the manner of champagne. A few bottles may be kept in a warm place to ripen, or a small piece of lump sugar may be put into each bottle before corking, if the cider be wanted for immediate use, or for consumption during the cooler portion of the year, but for warm weather and for long keeping this is inadmissible. The bottled stock should be stored in a cool cellar, when the quality will be greatly improved by age.

TO CAN CIDER

Cider, if taken when first made, brought to the boiling heat, and canned, precisely as fruit is canned, will keep from year to year without any change of taste. Canned up this way in the fall, it may be kept a half-dozen years or longer, as good as when first made. It is better that the cider be settled and poured off from the dregs, and when brought to boiling heat the scum that gathers on the surface taken off; but the only precaution necessary to preservation of the cider is the sealing of it air tight when boiling hot.

The juice of other fruit can, no doubt, be preserved in the same way. To all tastes not already corrupted by strong drinks, these unfermented juices are very delicious. The juice of the grape is better than wine a century old, and more healthy. Churches believing in literal eating and drinking at the Lord’s supper could in this way avoid the poisonous fermented spirits and drink the pure unfermented juice of the grape, as was doubtless done by the primitive Christians.

BOILING CIDER

To prepare cider for boiling, the first process is to filter it immediately on coming from the press. This is easiest done by placing some sticks crosswise in the bottom of a barrel,—a flour barrel with a single head is the best,—wherein an inch hole has been bored, and covering these sticks with say four inches of clean rye or wheat straw, and then filling the barrel to within a foot of the top with clean sand or coal dust,—sand is the best. Pour the cider as it comes from the press into the top of this barrel, drawing it off as soon as it comes out at the bottom into air-tight casks, and let it stand in the cellar until March. Then draw it out with as little exposure to the air as possible, put it into bottles that can be tightly and securely corked, and in two months it will be fit for use.

TO CLEAR CIDER

To clear and improve cider generally take two quarts of ground horseradish and one pound of thick gray filtering paper to the barrel, and either shake or stir until the paper has separated into small shreds, and let it stand for twenty-four hours, when the cider may be drawn off by means of a siphon or a stop cock. Instead of paper, a preparation of wool may be taken, which is to be had in the market, and which is preferable to paper, as it has simply to be washed with water, when it may be used again.

CIDER, TO PRESERVE AND KEEP SWEET

1. To one barrel of cider, put in one pound of mustard-seed, two pounds of raisins, one-quarter pound of the sticks (bark) of cinnamon. 2. When the cider in the barrel is in a lively fermentation, add as much white sugar as will be equal to one-quarter or three-quarters of a pound to each gallon of cider (according as the apples are sweet or sour); let the fermentation proceed until the liquid has the taste to suit, then add one-quarter of an ounce of sulphite (not sulphate) of lime to each gallon of cider, shake well, and let it stand three days, and bottle for use.

The sulphite should first be dissolved in a quart or so of cider before introducing it into the barrel of cider. 3. When fermentation commences in one barrel, draw off the liquor into another one, straining through a flannel cloth. Put into the cider three-quarters of an ounce of the oil of sassafras, and the same of the oil of winter green, well shaken up in a pint of alcohol. But one difficulty is said to pertain to this preparation of cider. It is so palatable that people won’t keep it long.

CIDER CHAMPAGNE

Five gallons good cider, one quart spirit, one and one-quarter pounds honey or sugar. Mix, and let them rest for a fortnight, then fine with one gill of skimmed milk. This, put up in champagne bottles, silvered, and labelled, has often been sold for champagne. It opens very sparkling.

CHERRY CIDER

Seven gallons of apple cider, two quarts of dried black cherries, one pint of dried blueberries, one-half pint of elderberries, eighteen pounds of brown sugar.

DEVONSHIRE CIDER

The apples, after being plucked, are left in heaps in the orchard for some time, to complete their ripening, and render them more saccharine. They are then crushed between grooved cylinders, surmounted by a hopper, or in a circular trough, by two vertical edge-wheels of wood moved by a horse; after passing through which, they are received into large tubs or crocks, and are then called pomace. They are afterwards laid on the vat in alternate layers of the pomace and clean straw, called reeds. They are then pressed, a little water being occasionally added. The juice passes through a hair sieve, or similar strainer, and is received in a large vessel, whence it is run into casks or open vats, where everything held in mechanical suspension is deposited.

The fermentation is often slow of being developed; though the juice be set in November or December, the working sometimes hardly commences till March. Till this time the cider is sweet; it now becomes pungent and vinous, and is ready to be racked for use. If the fermentation continue, it is usual to rack it again into a clean cask that has been well sulphured out, and to leave behind the head and sediment; or two or three cans of cider are put into a clean cask, and a match of brimstone burned in it. It is then agitated, by which the fermentation of that quantity is completely stopped. The cask is then nearly filled, the fermentation of the whole is checked, the process of racking is repeated until it becomes so, and is continued from time to time till the cider is in a quiet state and fit for drinking.

FRENCH CIDER
After the fruit is mashed in a mill, between iron cylinders, it is allowed to remain in a large tun or tub for fourteen or fifteen hours, before pressing. The juice is placed in casks, which are kept quite full, and so placed under gawntrees, or stillions, that small tubs may be put under them, to receive the matter that works over. At the end of three or four days for sweet cider, and nine or ten days for strong cider, it is racked into sulphured casks, and then stored in a cool place.

WESTERN CIDER
To one pound of sugar, add one-half ounce of tartaric acid, two tablespoonfuls of good yeast. Dissolve the sugar in one quart of warm water; put all in a gallon jug, shake it well, fill the jug with pure cold water, let it stand uncorked twelve hours, and it is fit for use.

CIDER WITHOUT APPLES
To each gallon of cold water, put one pound common sugar, one-half ounce tartaric acid, one tablespoonful of yeast. Shake well, make in the evening, and it will be fit for use next day. Make in a keg a few gallons at a time, leaving a few quarts to make into next time, not using yeast again until keg needs rinsing. If it gets a little sour, make a little more into it, or put as much water with it as there is cider, and put it with the vinegar.

If it is desired to bottle this cider by manufacturers of small drinks, you will proceed as follows: five gallons hot water, thirty pounds brown sugar, three-quarters pound tartaric acid, twenty-five gallons cold water, three pints of hops or brewers’ yeast worked into paste with three-quarters pound flour, and one pint water will be required in making this paste. Put all together in a barrel, which it will fill, and let it work twenty-four hours, the yeast running out at a bung all the time, by putting in a little occasionally to keep it full. Then bottle, putting in two or three broken raisins to each bottle, and it will nearly equal champagne.

CIDER WINE
Let the new cider from sour apples (ripe, sound fruit preferred) ferment from one to three weeks, as the weather is warm or cool. When it has attained to a lively fermentation, add to each gallon, according to its acidity, from one-half pound to two pounds of white crushed sugar, and let the whole ferment until it possesses precisely the taste which it is desired should be permanent. In this condition pour out one quart of the cider, and add for each gallon of cider one-quarter ounce of sulphite of lime, not sulphate.

Stir the powder and cider until intimately mixed, and return the emulsion to the fermenting liquid. Agitate briskly and thoroughly for a few moments, and then let the cider settle. Fermentation will cease at once. When, after a few days, the cider has become clear, draw off carefully, to avoid the sediment, and bottle. If loosely corked, which is better, it will become a sparkling cider wine, and may be kept indefinitely long.

TO MAKE CLARY WINE
Take twelve pounds of Malaga raisins, pick them and chop them very small, put them in a tub, and to each pound one-half pint of water. Let them steep ten or eleven days, stirring it twice every day; you must keep it covered close all the while. Then strain it oif, and put it into a vessel, and about one-quarter peck of the tops of clary, when it is in blossom; stop it close for six weeks, and then bottle it off. In two or three months it is fit to drink. It is apt to have a great sediment at bottom; therefore it is best to draw it off by plugs, or tap it pretty high.

TO MAKE FINE CLARY WINE
To five gallons of water put twelve and one-half pounds of sugar, and the whites of six eggs well beaten. Set it over the fire, and let it boil gently near an hour; skim it clean and put it in a tub, and when it is near cold, then put into the vessel you keep it in about half a strike of clary in the blossom, stripped from the stalks, flowers and little leaves together, and one pint of new ale-yeast. Then put in the liquor, and stir it two or three times a day for three days; when it has done working, stop it up, and bottle it at three or four months old, if it is clear.

CLOVER WINE
Three quarts blossoms, four quarts boiling water; let stand three days. Drain, and to the flower heads add three more quarts of water and the peel of one lemon. Boil fifteen minutes, drain, and add to other juice. To every quart, add one pound of sugar; ferment with one cup of yeast. Keep in warm room three weeks, then bottle.

TO MAKE COCK ALE
Take five gallons of ale, and a large cock, the older the better. Parboil the cock, flay him, and stamp him in a stone mortar till his bones are broken (you must craw and gut him when you flay him), then put the cock into one quart of sack, and put to it one and one-half pounds of raisins of the sun stoned, some blades of mace, and a few cloves. Put all these into a canvas bag, and a little before you find the ale has done working, put the ale and bag together into a vessel. In a week or nine days’ time bottle it up; fill the bottle but just above the neck, and give it the same time to ripen as other ale.

TO MAKE COWSLIP WINE
To three gallons of water put seven pounds of sugar; stir it well together, and beat the whites of ten eggs very well, and mix with the liquor, and make it boil as fast as possible. Skim it well, and let it continue boiling two hours; then strain it through a hair sieve, and set it a cooling, and when it is cold as wort should be, put a small quantity of yeast to it on a toast, or in a dish. Let it stand all night working; then bruise one-half peck of cowslips, put them into your vessel, and your liquor upon them, adding three ounces of syrup of lemons. Cut a turf of grass and lay on the bung; let it stand a fortnight, and then bottle it. Put your tap into your vessel before you put your wine in, that you may not shake it.

COWSLIP OR CLARY WINE, NO. 2
The best method of making these wines is to put in the pips dry, when the fermentation of the wine has subsided. This method is preferred for two reasons: first, it may be performed at any time of the year when lemons are cheapest, and when other wine is making; second, all waste of the pips is avoided. Being light, they are sure to work over if put in the cask while the wine is in a state of fermentation.

Boil fourteen pounds of good moist sugar with five gallons of water, and one ounce of hops. Shave thin the rinds of eight lemons or Seville oranges, or part of each; they must be put in the boil the last quarter of an hour, or the boiling liquor poured over them. Squeeze the juice to be added when cool, and rinse the pulp in the hot liquor, and keep it filled up, either with wine or new beer, as long as it works over; then paste brown paper, and leave it for four, six, or eight months.

The quantity of flowers is one quart of flowers to each gallon of wine. Let them be gathered on a fine, dry day, and carefully picked from every bit of stalk and green. Spread them thinly on trays, sheets, or papers, and turn them often. When thoroughly dry put them in paper bags, until the wine is ready to receive them. Put them in at the bung-hole; stir them down two or three times a day, till all the cowslips have sunk; at the same time add isinglass.

Then paste over again with paper. In six months the wine will be fit to bottle, but will be improved by keeping longer in the cask. The pips shrink into a very small compass in drying; the quantity allowed is of fresh-gathered flowers. Observe, also, that wine well boiled, and refined with hops and isinglass, is just as good used from the cask as if bottled, which is a great saving of time and hazard. Wine made on the above principles has been often praised by connoisseurs, and supposed to have been bottled half a day. 

CURRANT SHRUB
Take white currants when quite ripe, pick them off the stalks, and bruise them. Strain out the juice through a cloth, and to two quarts of the juice put two pounds of loaf sugar; when it is dissolved, add one gallon of rum, then strain through a flannel bag that will keep in the jelly, and it will run off clear. Then bottle for use.

CURRANT WINE
Take four gallons of currants, not too ripe, and strip them into an earthen stein that has a cover to it. Then take two and one-half gallons of water and five and one-half pounds of double refined sugar; boil the sugar and water together, skim it, and pour it boiling hot on the currants, letting it stand forty-eight hours; then strain it through a flannel bag into the stein again, let it stand a fortnight to settle, and bottle it out.

CURRANT WINE, NO. 2
The currants should be fully ripe when picked. Put them into a large tub, in which they should remain a day or two, then crush with the hands, unless you have a small patent wine-press, in which they should not be pressed too much, or the stems will be bruised, and impart a disagreeable taste to the juice. If the hands are used, put the crushed fruit, after the juice has been poured off, in a cloth or sack and press out the remaining juice. Put the juice back into the tub after cleansing it, where it should remain about three days, until the first stages of fermentation are over, and remove once or twice a day the scum copiously arising to the top.

Then put the juice in a vessel,—a demijohn, keg, or barrel,—of a size to suit the quantity made, and to each quart of juice add three pounds of the best yellow sugar, and soft water sufficient to make a gallon. Thus, ten quarts of juice and thirty pounds of sugar will give you ten gallons of wine, and so on in proportion. Those who do not like sweet wine can reduce the quantity of sugar to two and one-half, or who wish it very sweet, raise to three and one-half pounds per gallon. The vessel must be full, and the bung or stopper left off until fermentation ceases, which will be in twelve or fifteen days. Meanwhile, the cask must be filled up daily with currant juice left over, as fermentation throws out the impure matter.

When fermentation ceases, rack the wine off carefully, either from the spigot or by a siphon, and keep running all the time. Cleanse the cask thoroughly with boiling water, then return the wine, bung up tightly, and let it stand four or five months, when it will be fit to drip, and can be bottled if desired. All the vessels, casks, etc., should be perfectly sweet, and the whole operation should be done with an eye to cleanliness. In such event, every drop of brandy or other spirituous liquors added will detract from the flavor of the wine, and will not in the least degree increase its keeping qualities. Currant wine made in this way will keep for an age.

CURRANT WINE, NO. 3
To every pailful of currants, on the stem, put one pailful of water; mash and strain. To each gallon of the mixture of juice and water add three and one-quarter pounds of sugar. Mix well and put into your cask, which should be placed in the cellar, on the tilt, that it may be racked off in October, without stirring up the sediment. Two bushels of currants will make one barrel of wine. Four gallons of the mixture of juice and water will, after thirteen pounds of sugar are added, make five gallons of wine. The barrel should be filled within three inches of the bung, which must be made air tight by placing wet clay over it after it is driven in.

2. Pick your currants when ripe on a fair day, crush them well, and to every gallon of juice add two gallons of water and three pounds of sugar; if you wish it sweeter, add another one-half pound of sugar. Mix all together in some large vessel, then dip out into earthen jars. Let it stand to ferment in some cool place, skimming it every other morning. In about ten days it will be ready to strain off; bottle and seal, or put in a cask and cork tight. The longer you keep it the better it will be.

CURRANT WINE, NO. 4
Into a five gallon keg put five quarts of currant juice, fifteen pounds of sugar, and fill up with water. Let it stand in a cool place until sufficiently worked, and then bung up tight. You can let it remain in the cask, and draw out as you want to use it.

CURRANT OR GOOSEBERRY WINE, WITHOUT BOILING
Take ten quarts of fruit, bruise it, and add to it five quarts of water. Stir it well together, and let it stand twelve hours; then strain it through a coarse canvas bag or hair sieve, add eleven pounds of good Lisbon sugar, and stir it well. Put the pulp of the fruit into a gallon more water; stir it about and let it stand twelve hours. Then strain to the above, again stirring it; cover the tub with a sack. In a day or two the wine will begin to ferment. When the whole surface is covered with a thick, yeasty froth, begin to skim it on to a sieve. What runs through may be returned to the wine. Do this from time to time for several days, till no more yeast forms. Then put it into the cask.

IMITATION OF CYPRESS WINE
To five gallons of water put five quarts of the juice of white elderberries, pressed gently through a sieve without bruising the seeds. Add to every gallon of liquor one and one-half pounds of sugar, and to the whole quantity one ounce of sliced ginger, and one-half ounce of cloves. Boil this nearly an hour, taking off the scum as it rises, and pour in an open tub to cool. Work it with ale yeast spread upon a toast of bread for three days. Then turn it into a vessel that will just hold it, adding about three-quarters pound bruised raisins, to lie in the liquor till drawn off, which should not be done till the wine is fine.

DAISY WINE
One quart of daisy heads, one quart of cold water. Let stand forty-eight hours. Strain and add three-quarters pound of sugar to each quart of liquid. Let stand about two weeks, or till it stops fermenting. Strain again and bottle. It improves with keeping.

DANDELION WINE
Four quarts of dandelions. Cover with four quarts of boiling water; let stand three days. Add peel of three oranges and one lemon. Boil fifteen minutes; drain and add juice of oranges and lemon to four pounds of sugar and one cup of yeast. Keep in warm room and strain again; let stand for three weeks. It is then ready to bottle and serve.

DAMSON WINE
Gather the fruit dry, weigh, and bruise it, and to every eight pounds of fruit add one gallon of water; boil the water, pour it on the fruit scalding hot. Let it stand for two days; then draw it off, put it into a clean cask, and to every gallon of liquor add two and one-half pounds of good sugar. Fill the cask. It may be bottled off after standing in the cask a year. On bottling the wine, put a small lump of loaf sugar into every bottle.

DAMSON, OR BLACK CHERRY WINE

Damson, or Black Cherry Wine may be made in the same manner, excepting the addition of spice, and that the sugar should be finer. If kept in an open vessel four days, these wines will ferment of themselves; but it is better to forward the process by the use of a little yeast, as in former recipes. They will be fit for use in about eight months. As there is a flatness belonging to both these wines if bottled, a teaspoonful of rice, a lump or two of sugar, or four or five raisins will tend to enliven it.

EBULUM

To one hogshead of strong ale take a heaped bushel of elderberries, and one-half pound of juniper-berries beaten. Put in all the berries when you put in the hops, and let them boil together till the berries break in pieces, then work it up as you do ale. When it has done working add to it one-half pound of ginger, one-half ounce of cloves, one-half ounce of mace, one ounce of nutmegs, one ounce of cinnamon, grossly beaten, one-half pound of citron, one-half pound of eringo root, and likewise of candied orange-peel. Let the sweetmeats be cut in pieces very thin, and put with the spice into a bag, and hang it in the vessel when you stop it up. So let it stand till it is fine, then bottle it up, and drink it with lumps of double refined sugar in the glass.

ELDER-FLOWER WINE

Take the flowers of elder, and be careful that you don’t let any stalks in; to every quart of flowers put one gallon of water, and three pounds of loaf sugar. Boil the water and sugar a quarter of an hour, then pour it on the flowers and let it work three days; then strain the wine through a hair sieve, and put it into a cask. To every ten gallons of wine add one ounce of isinglass dissolved in cider, and six whole eggs. Close it up and let it stand six months, and then bottle it.

TO MAKE ELDER WINE

Take five pounds of Malaga raisins, rub them and shred them small; then take one gallon of water, boil it an hour, and let it stand till it is but blood-warm; then put it in an earthen crock or tub, with your raisins. Let them steep ten days, stirring them once or twice a day; then pass the liquor through a hair sieve, and have in readiness one pint of the juice of elderberries drawn off as you do for jelly of currants; then mix it cold with the liquor, stir it well together, put it into a vessel, and let it stand in a warm place. When it has done working, stop it close. Bottle it about Candlemas.

ELDERBERRY WINE
Nine quarts elderberry juice, nine quarts water, eleven and one-half pounds white sugar, two ounces red tartar. These are put into a cask, a little yeast added, and the whole is fermented. When undergoing fermentation, one ounce ginger root, one ounce allspice, one-quarter ounce cloves are put into a bag of clean cotton cloth, and suspended in the cask. They will give a pleasant flavor to the wine, which will become clear in about two months, and may be drawn off and bottled. Add some brandy to this wine, but if the fermentation is properly conducted, this is not necessary.

ELDER WINE, NO. 2
Take spring-water, and let it boil half an hour; then measure two and one-half gallons, and let it stand to cool. Then have in readiness ten pounds of raisins of the sun well picked and rubbed in a cloth, and hack them so as to cut them, but not too small; then put them in, the water being cold, and let them stand nine days, stirring them two or three times a day. Then have ready three pints of the juice of elderberries full ripe, which must be infused in boiling water, or baked three hours; then strain out the raisins, and when the elder liquor is cold, mix that with it, but it is best to boil up the juice to a syrup, one-half pound of sugar to every pint of juice. Boil and skim it, and when cold mix it with your raisin liquor, and two or three spoonfuls of good ale yeast. Stir it well together; then put it into a vessel fit for it, let it stand in a warm place to work, and in your cellar five or six months.

ELDER WINE, NO. 3
The quantity of fruit required is one gallon of ripe elderberries, and one quart of damsons or sloes, for every two gallons of wine to be produced. Boil them in water till the damsons burst, frequently breaking them with a flat stick; then strain and return the liquor to the copper. The quantity of liquor required for nine gallons of wine will be ten gallons; therefore if the first liquor proves short of this, add water to the pulp, rub it about and strain to the rest. Boil two hours with twenty-three pounds of coarse moist sugar; three-quarters of a pound of ginger bruised, one-half a pound of allspice, and one ounce of cinnamon, loosely tied in a muslin bag, and two or three ounces of hops. When quite cool work on the foregoing plan, tun in two days, drop in the spice, and suspend the bag by a string not long enough to let it touch the bottom of the cask; fill it up for a fortnight, then paste over stiff brown paper. It will be fit to tap in two months; will keep for years, but does not improve by age like many other wines. It is never better than in the first year of its age.

ELDER WINE (FLAVORED WITH HOPS)
The berries, which must be thoroughly ripe, are to be stripped from the stalk, and squeezed to a pulp. Stir and squeeze this pulp every day for four days; then separate the juice from the pulp by passing through a cane sieve or basket. To every gallon of juice, add one-half gallon of cold water. Boil four and one-half gallons with three ounces of hops for one-half hour; then strain it and boil again, with one and one-half pounds of sugar to the gallon, for about ten minutes, skimming all the time; pour it into a cooler, and, while luke-warm, put a piece of bread with a little balm on it to set it working. Put it into a cask as soon as cold; when it has done working, cork it down, and leave it six months before it is tapped. It is then drinkable, but improves with age exceedingly.

TO MAKE ELDER WINE AT CHRISTMAS
Take five pounds of Malaga or Lipara raisins, rub them clean, and shred them small. Then take five quarts of water, boil it an hour, and when it is near cold put it in a tub with the raisins; let them steep ten days, and stir them once or twice a day. Then strain it through a hair sieve, and by infusion draw one pint of elder-juice, and one-quarter of a pint of damson juice. Make the juice into a thin syrup, a pound of sugar to a pint of juice, and not boil it much, but just enough to keep. When you have strained out the raisin liquor, put that and the syrup into a vessel fit for it, and one-half a pound of sugar. Stop the bung with a cork till it gathers to a head, then open it, and let it stand till it has done working; then put the cork in again, and stop it very close, and let it stand in a warm place two or three months, and then bottle it. Make the elder and damson juice into syrup in its season, and keep it in a cool cellar till you have convenience to make the wine.

TO MAKE ELDER-FLOWER WATER
Take two large handfuls of dried elder-flowers, and ten gallons of spring-water; boil the water, and pour it scalding hot upon the flowers. The next day put to every gallon of water five pounds of Malaga raisins, the stalks being first picked off, but not washed; chop them grossly with a chopping-knife, then put them into your boiled water, and stir the water, raisins, and flowers well together, and so do twice a day for twelve days. Then press out the juice clear, as long as you can get any liquor out. Then put it in your barrel fit for it, and stop it up two or three days till it works, and in a few days stop it up close, and let it stand two or three months, till it is clear; then bottle it.

ENGLISH FIG WINE
Take the large blue figs when pretty ripe, and steep them in white wine, having made some slits in them, that they may swell and gather in the substance of the wine. Then slice some other figs and let them simmer over a fire in water until they are reduced to a kind of pulp. Then strain out the water, pressing the pulp hard and pour it as hot as possible on the figs that are imbrued in the wine. Let the quantities be nearly equal, but the water somewhat more than the wine and figs. Let them stand twenty-four hours, mash them well together, and draw off what will run without squeezing. Then press the rest, and if not sweet enough add a sufficient quantity of sugar to make it so. Let it ferment, and add to it a little honey and sugar candy, then fine it with white of eggs, and a little isinglass, and draw it off for use.

TO MAKE FRONTIGNAC WINE
Take three gallons of water, six pounds of white sugar, and three pounds of raisins of the sun cut small; boil these together an hour. Then take of the flowers of elder, when they are falling, and will shake off, the quantity of half a peck; put them in the liquor when it is almost cold. The next day put in three spoonfuls of syrup of lemons and two spoonfuls of ale-yeast, and two days after put it in a vessel that is fit for it, and when it has stood two months, bottle it off.

GINGER BEER

The proportions of this may vary. Loaf sugar is preferable to moist; some say a pound to a gallon, others a pound and a half. Some allow but half an ounce of ginger (sliced or bruised) to a gallon, others an ounce. A lemon to a gallon is the usual proportion, to which some add a quarter of an ounce or half an ounce of cream of tartar. The white of an egg to each gallon is useful for clarifying, but not absolutely necessary. Some people put a quarter of a pint of brandy to four gallons of beer by way of keeping it; half an ounce of hops boiled in it would answer the same purpose. Boil the sugar, and shaved rind of lemons; let it boil half an hour. Clear the lemons of the white pith and put them in the wine. When cool, stir in the yeast (two tablespoonfuls to a gallon), put it in the barrel without straining, and bung close. In a fortnight draw off and bottle. It will be ready for use in another fortnight, and will keep longer than ginger pop. If cream of tartar is used, pour the boiling liquor over it, but do not boil it.

GINGER BEER, NO. 2

Seven pounds crushed white sugar, eight gallons water, one-half cup of yeast, four ounces best powdered ginger, a few drops of essence of lemon, one-half teaspoonful essence of cloves. To the ginger pour one pint of boiling water and let it stand fifteen or twenty minutes. Dissolve the sugar in two quarts of warm water, pour both into a barrel half-filled with cold water, then add the essence and the yeast; let it stand one-half hour, then fill up with cold water. Let it ferment six to twelve hours and bottle.

GINGER WINE

Take four gallons of water, ten pounds of loaf sugar, one and one-quarter pounds of bruised ginger, one ounce of hops, the shaved rinds of five lemons or Seville oranges. Let these boil together for two hours, carefully skimming. Pour it, without straining, on to two pounds of raisins. When cool, put in the juice of the lemons or oranges; rinse the pulp in a pint or two of the wine, and strain it to the rest. Ferment it with yeast; mix one-half cup of solid yeast with a pint or two of the wine, and with that work the rest. Next day tun it, raisins, hops, ginger, and all together, and fill it up for a fortnight either with wine or with good new beer; then dissolve one ounce of isinglass in a little of the wine, and return it to the rest to fine it. A few days afterward bung it close.

This wine will be in full perfection in six months. It may be bottled, but is apt to fly; and if made exactly by the above directions, and drawn from the cask, it will sparkle like champagne.

TO MAKE GOOSEBERRY WINE
Boil four gallons of water, and one-half pound of sugar an hour, skim it well, and let it stand till it is cold. Then to every quart of that water, allow one and one-half pounds of gooseberries, first beaten or bruised very well; let it stand twenty-four hours. Then strain it out, and to every gallon of this liquor put three pounds of sugar; let it stand in the vat twelve hours. Then take the thick scum off, and put the clear into a vessel fit for it, and let it stand a month; then draw it off, and rinse the vessel with some of the liquor. Put it in again, and let it stand four months, and bottle it.

GOOSEBERRY WINE
Take to every four pounds of gooseberries one and one-quarter pounds of sugar, and one quart of fair water. Bruise the berries, and steep them twenty-four hours in the water, stirring them often; then press the liquor from them, and put your sugar to the liquor. Then put in a vessel fit for it, and when it is done working stop it up, and let it stand a month; then rack it off into another vessel, and let it stand five or six weeks longer. Then bottle it out, putting a small lump of sugar into every bottle; cork your bottles well, and three months’ end it will be fit to drink. In the same manner is currant and raspberry wine made; but cherry wine differs, for the cherries are not to be bruised, but stoned, and put the sugar and water together, and give it a boil and a skim, and then put in your fruit, letting it stew with a gentle fire a quarter of an hour, and then let it run through a sieve without pressing, and when it is cold put it in a vessel, and order it as your gooseberry or currant wine. The only cherries for wine are the great bearers, Murray cherries, Morelloes, Black Flanders, or the John Treduskin cherries.

GOOSEBERRY WINE, NO. 2
Pick and bruise the gooseberries, and to every pound of berries put one quart of cold spring water, and let it stand three days, stirring it twice or thrice a day. Add to every gallon of juice three pounds of loaf sugar. Fill the barrel, and when it is done working, add to every ten quarts of liquor one pint of brandy and a little isinglass. The gooseberries must be picked when they are just changing color. The liquor ought to stand in the barrel six months. Taste it occasionally, and bottle when the sweetness has gone off.

GOOSEBERRY AND CURRANT WINE
The following method of making superior gooseberry and currant wines is recommended in a French work.

For currant wine four pounds of honey, dissolved in seven gallons of boiling water, to which, when clarified, is added the juice of four pounds of red or white currants. It is then fermented for twenty-four hours and one pound of sugar to every one gallon of water is added. The preparation is afterward clarified with whites of eggs and cream of tartar.

For gooseberry wine, the fruit is gathered dry when about half-ripe, and then pounded in a mortar. The juice when properly strained is mixed with sugar in the proportion of three pounds to every two gallons of juice. It is then left in a quiet state for fifteen days, at the expiration of which it is carefully poured off and left to ferment for three months, when the quantity is under fifteen gallons, and five months when double that quantity. It is then bottled and soon becomes fit for drinking.



Source:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pxv04G48GK0   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPTeNhjuS1E
by Helen S. Wright

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23 EASY COLD FRAME PLANS TO EXTEND THE GROWING SEASON HOW TO BUILD COLD FRAMES FOR YOUR WINTER GARDEN

23 EASY COLD FRAME PLANS TO EXTEND THE GROWING SEASON HOW TO BUILD COLD FRAMES FOR YOUR WINTER GARDEN

As the cold weather starts to come on, many of us sigh and look forward to the start of the spring again, when we can once more grow fresh vegetables and fruit for our tables. But it doesn’t have to be like that! There’s many cold-weather vegetables that can easily grow with just a little protection. And building a cold frame is the perfect solution.

While a cold frame can be as simple and small as a plastic 2-liter bottle with the bottom cut off, carefully placed overtop of a plant to offer a little more warmth, what I’ve got for you today is a list of 26 different concepts and plans for winter cold frames that encompass a bit more space in your garden and allow for a better collection of vegetables. So whether you’d like to grow spinach or beets, protect your flowers or even start a few seedlings early on, there’s a plan here for everyone.

Since there’s a variety of materials that can be used to construct cold frames, I’m going to split these up by the clear material used on the top of the frame. From there, the only limit is your imagination!

1.Plastic Sheeting/Soft Plastic Cold Frames

Simple Cold Frame

This particular cold frame is not elaborate, but it works quite well. Made of plywood and poly sheeting, its sloped shape allows for rain drainage while keeping the plants within warm in the cooler months of the year.

 

 

Materials: Plywood, poly sheeting, misc tools and bolts/nuts/screws.
Dimensions: 4’ wide x 4’ deep, sloped top peaks at 15”
Difficulty: Beginner to intermediate
Cost: $$

 

2.PVC Cold Frame

Constructed entirely of PVC and plastic sheeting, this basic PVC frame keeps warmth inside and allows ease of access through its triangular hinged roof. The plastic sheeting can be easily replaced year after year as needed.

 

 

 

Materials: PVC and PVC connectors, 6mil clear plastic sheeting, pipe glue
Dimensions: 4’ wide x 2’ 4” deep
Difficulty: Beginner
Cost: $

 

3.Lightweight Lid Cold Frame

This fascinating, lightweight cold frame was designed for use with an temperature-controlled automatic opening vent, and it’s really cool!

If you’re concerned that your plants will get too warm while you’re at work during the day, this design is perfect, as the lid will open itself and close itself in response to the ambient temperature.

 

 

Materials: Lightweight wood, 8mil vinyl sheeting, PVC pipe, automatic venting control (like a Univent)
Dimensions: 3’ wide x 6’ long
Difficulty: Intermediate
Cost: $$$

 

4.Cold Frame Tent

If you have existing raised beds, all you need is the top for this to rest on top of your beds. If you don’t, add a box around your garden plot, and with very little difficulty, you are set up to endure the weather while still growing plants to a reasonable height!

 

Materials: Heavy plastic sheeting, lumber, a hardwood dowel, screws or nails
Dimensions: Variable depending on need
Difficulty: Beginner to intermediate
Cost: $-$$

 

5.Sleek & Efficient Cold Frame

This functional cold frame is intended to be constructed for an already-existing raised bed. While a slight variation to the design would enable runoff from rains to move more easily, it’s a great option for people in cold but less-rainy environments just as it is already.

 

 

Materials: Lumber, heavy plastic sheeting, screws or nails
Dimensions: 4’ wide x 8’ deep x 15” tall
Difficulty: Beginner
Cost: $

 

6.PVC Cold Frame Hoop House

This arched hoop house-style cold frame is not elaborate, but it does the trick! Made to fit just inside the walls of a raised bed, the two plywood ends keep wind out of the tunnel, and the plastic sheeting overtop allows plenty of light to reach your plants.

 

Materials: PVC, plastic sheeting, plywood, 2×3 studs, misc screws and other assorted equipment
Dimensions: Variable, can be adjusted to fit most raised beds
Difficulty: Beginner to intermediate
Cost: $-$$

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7.PVC Cold Frame Hoop House

This one does not come with exact plans, so it takes a little bit of plotting to recreate it. However, it’s a simple enough structure. It’s adorably cute, as it looks like a little house, and it’s incredibly useful, as only half the lid needs to be lifted to access the plants inside or to provide ventilation.

 

Materials: Lumber, plastic sheeting, hinges, nails or screws, and a chain with spring for each end
Dimensions: 66” long x 24” wide
Difficulty: Intermediate
Cost: $$

8.Plastic Bottle Cold Frame

Do you find that plastic water bottles build up in your house or recycling bin? Well, save some, and you too can create this unusual, but effective cold frame! If you add a little silicone caulk between the bottles, you can make it completely enclosed, or you can leave the gaps to allow some vent space. Whichever you do, this reuse project makes the most of what would otherwise be landfill fodder or recycling plant materials.

 

Materials: Empty plastic bottles, wood doweling or slats, lumber, screws or nails, silicone caulk (optional)
Dimensions: Variable depending on size desired
Difficulty: Beginner to intermediate
Cost:

9.Hard Plastic, Acrylic, or Plexiglass Cold Frames

Quick ‘n Easy Cold Frame

This cold frame is a really interesting design. While not the least expensive option due to the polycarbonate panels used for the top of the frame, it’s definitely one of the longest-lasting options, and is resistant to tearing or breakage of the sunlight panel. This style will last for years and years of use!

 

 

Materials: Translucent polycarbonate panels and their fasteners, lumber, silicone caulking, hinges and misc screws
Dimensions: 8’ wide x 4’ deep x 1’ tall
Difficulty: Intermediate
Cost: $$$

 

10.Portable Cold Frame

If you don’t have raised beds, this cold frame might be a great option for you. Brick forms a flat support at the base and helps to keep the soil warmed by the sun. The box is inexpensive plywood, and the only expensive part is clear acrylic glazing panels which you can pick up at most big-box hardware stores. The acrylic resists ice buildup, which adds an extra layer of protection.

 

Materials: Acrylic glazing, plywood, bricks, screws, hinges
Dimensions: 61” wide x 37 ½” deep x 24” tall
Difficulty: Beginner to intermediate
Cost: $$

 

11.Plexiglass Cold Frame

This plexiglass-topped cold frame offers a rigid surface that will repel snow and rain, but which also will allow plenty of light through to the plants below. It’s not the cheapest option, but it’s one of the strongest on the list! You can also modify this to use an old door in lieu of the plexiglass if you’d like.

 

Materials: Plexiglass sheeting, lumber, hinges and assorted screws/tools
Dimensions: 6’ wide x 3’ deep, but can be variable if using old door instead of plexiglass
Difficulty: Beginner to intermediate
Cost: $$

 

12.Raised Bed Cold Frame

Designed to sit on top of a 4’x4’ raised bed, this cold frame is an easy build and works extremely well. The sloped lid provides rain runoff. Best of all, the whole thing can be lifted off the raised bed when the weather is warmer, as it’s fairly lightweight.

 

Materials: Lumber, acrylic sheets, screen door pneumatic closers, misc screws and hinges
Dimensions: Fits overtop a 4’ x 4’ raised bed
Difficulty: Beginner
Cost: $$

 

13.Dead Simple Cold Frame

As the name would imply, this cold frame is dead simple to build. The most complex part of the entire build is getting the angled top right. Otherwise, it’s something that can easily be knocked together in a couple hours’ time!

 

 

Materials: Lumber, greenhouse plastic, misc screws
Dimensions: 8’ wide x 4’ deep x 25” tall
Difficulty: Beginner
Cost: $$

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14.Glassless Cold Frame

On occasion, you can find old skylight domes that have been removed because they’ve started to leak at the sides. But these don’t have to be thrown away! Give them new life by using the dome as a top for a cold frame! A simple box base supports the skylight dome, allowing you to grow your plants right underneath.

 

Materials: Old skylight dome, lumber, screws
Dimensions: Depends on size of skylight dome
Difficulty: Beginner
Cost: $$

 

15.Cold Frame Table

This cold frame actually sits up above the ground, like a table, and is perfect for starting seeds in the winter! With a clear acrylic sheet on top, plenty of light hits the inside, and there’s a handy shelf underneath which provides a little extra storage space. Best of all, when it’s not in use as a cold frame, it can be repurposed as a handy potting table. The instructions are in a handy video format.

 

Materials: Clear sheet acrylic, lumber, screws or nails, hinges
Dimensions: 2’ wide x 3’ deep x 38” tall
Difficulty: Intermediate
Cost: $$

16.Glass Topped Cold Frames

Salvaged Window Cold Frame

If you’ve redone the windows in your house recently, or have a store locally who sells salvaged pane windows, this project is for you!

This makes a beautiful addition to the winter garden, and the panes of glass easily keep snow from reaching your fragile plants.

 

 

Materials: Salvaged window, lumber, misc bolts/hinges, tools
Dimensions: Variable, depends on size of salvaged window
Difficulty: Beginner to intermediate
Cost: $$

17.Old Window Cold Frame

Another idea using salvaged windows, this cold frame is built much taller, enabling it to be used for larger plants. The windows fold open from the center to the outsides, making it surprisingly easy to vent on a warmer day.

 

 

Materials: Salvaged window panes, lumber, misc bolts/hinges, tools
Dimensions: Variable, depends on size of salvaged windows
Difficulty: Beginner to intermediate
Cost: $$

18.Compact DIY Cold Frame

This smaller cold frame uses a single-pane reclaimed window as its top, and 2×6 boards to make up the sides. Thicker than most plywood frames, it does a really good job at keeping warmth inside!

 

 

Materials: Reclaimed window, lumber, hinges and misc screws
Dimensions: Depends on window, but example is 32”x32”
Difficulty: Beginner
Cost: $

19.Missouri Extension Cold Frame

Not only does this plan provide guidance in building a serviceable cold frame, but it teaches you how to build a “hotbed”, where more material (generally compost) is piled up around the sides of the cold frame to add extra insulation. Hotbeds are fantastic in very cold environments, as the warmth of the compost itself will keep the plants safer.

 

Materials: Glass sash, polyethylene or fiberglass for the top, lumber for the rest, needs hinges and assorted screws
Dimensions: 3’ wide by 6’ deep
Difficulty: Beginner
Cost: $$

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20.Vertical Cold Frame

This vertical cold frame is constructed almost completely of repurposed window frames, making it a great upcycling project as well! Built to rest against a wall, it is half-greenhouse, half-cold frame, and all very useful.

 

 

Materials: Reclaimed windows, lumber, misc hinges and screws
Dimensions: Variable depending on windows used
Difficulty: Intermediate
Cost: $

 

21.Pallet and Window Cold Frame

This upcycled pallet and window cold frame might be free, if you have a source of used pallets and windows! With a little ingenuity, you can have a very workable cold frame that will offer lots of protection to your plants for very little cash outlay.

 

 

 

Materials: Old pallets, reclaimed windows, nails or screws
Dimensions: Variable depending on parts available
Difficulty: Beginner
Cost: $

 

22.Brick and Window Cold Frame

Using cinderblocks or bricks and old windows, you can construct a cold frame that can easily be broken down into its component parts once the cold season is over, and stored away for future use. It’s nothing fancy, but protecting your plants does not have to be!

 

 

Materials: Cinderblocks or bricks, reclaimed windows
Dimensions: Variable depending on window size
Difficulty: Beginner
Cost: $

 

23.Hinged-Top Cold Frame

This great cold frame looks fantastic in the garden, and can be made using a wide variety of materials. While they used glass panels for theirs, you can do it with UV-resistant Lexan or plexiglass just as well. It does require a little more skill to build, but when it’s in place, it looks finished and clean.

 

Materials: Glass (alternately Lexan or plexiglass), lumber, dado set, screws or nails, hinges, misc other equipment
Dimensions: Variable, depends on size you need
Difficulty: Intermediate

So, if you want to have fresh lettuce or spinach all winter, would like to keep those flowers from freezing, or just want to experiment with early seed starting, there’s a cold frame here for everyone! Do you use a cold frame for winter gardening, and if so, did you build your own? Tell us all about your frame in the comments!

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16 Ancient House Designs That You Can Build Really Cheap (Potentially For Free)

16 Ancient House Designs That You Can Build Really Cheap (Potentially For Free)

Want to learn how to build a cheap house? Look no further. Let me ask you; how would your life change if you never had to pay rent or interest on a mortgage again? I bet it would take a significant weight off your shoulders. It sure would for me.

You’re not alone, in fact today most people in “civilized” parts of the world don’t own their homes but are indebted to banks or rent from a landlord. But it has not always been this way, as Henry David Thoreau so truthfully writes in his book Walden:

In the savage (Native American) state every family owns a shelter as good as the best, and sufficient for its coarser and simpler wants; but I think that I speak within bounds when I say that, though the birds of the air have their nests, and the foxes their holes, and the savages their wigwams, in modern civilized society not more than half the families own a shelter. In the large towns and cities, where civilization especially prevails, the number of those who own a shelter is a very small fraction of the whole. The rest pay an annual tax or this outside garnment of all, become indispensible summer and winter, which would buy a village of Indian wigwams, but now helps to keep them poor as long as they live.

Is this the best humanity can do?

Is it impossible to imagine a future where humans, just as other animals, own their shelter free and clear and don’t have to pay a “tax” their whole lives just to stay protected from the elements?

Of course not. This is crazy!

In the list below you’ll find examples of homes that “savage” people throughout the world built with their own hands using locally available materials that Nature provided for free. No mortgage or rent required.

Most of the examples on this list are small house designs. They are small because a small house takes less fuel to heat, less time and building materials to build, and for some of the more portable designs a small home is much easier to move.

What you take away from this list is up to you, but I have no doubt there’s a lot to learn from how our ancestors lived in harmony with their surroundings and adapted perfectly to their environments, no matter how harsh.

1. The Tipi

Tipis (also spelled Teepees) are tent-like American Indian houses used by Plains tribes. A tepee is made of a cone-shaped wooden frame with a covering of buffalo hide, and originally they were up to 12 feet high.

Like modern tents, tepees are carefully designed to set up and break down quickly. As a tribe moved from place to place, each family would bring their tipi poles and hide tent along with them.

Plains Indians migrated frequently to follow the movements of the buffalo herds, and it’s said an entire Plains Indian village could have their tipis packed up and ready to move within an hour.

2. The Lavvu

Sami family infront of their lavvu, 1900

The Lavvu has a design similar to a Native American tipi but is less vertical and more stable in high winds. It’s a temporary shelter used by the Sami people living on the treeless plains of northern Scandinavia, and it’s made of wooden poles which are covered in reindeer hides or, more recently, textile.

Modern designs of the lavvu have replaced the wooden poles with aluminium poles and heavier textiles with lighter fabrics. Today some people choose to heat the lavvu with an oven instead of an open fire and that has the benefit of producing less smoke, but it also produces less light making it quite dark inside.

3. The Wigwam

Wigwams, sometimes also known as birchbark houses, are Native American houses used by Algonquian Indians in the woodland regions.

These shelters are small, usually 8-10 feet tall, and they’re formed with a frame of arched poles, most often wooden, which are covered with some sort of roofing material ranging from grass, bark, brush, mats, reeds, hides or textile. The frame can be shaped like a dome, like a cone, or like a rectangle with an arched roof. The curved surfaces make it an ideal shelter for all kinds of conditions, and while wigwams are not portable they’re small and easy to build.

A first hand account from 1674 of Gookin, who was superindendent of the Indian subject to the Massachusetts Colony, says…

“The best of their houses are covered very neatly, tight and warm, with barks of trees, slipped from their bodies at those seasons when the sap is up, and made into great flakes, with pressure of weighty timber, when they are green….The meaner sort are covered with mats which they make of a kind of bulrush and are also indifferently tight and warm, but not so good as the former….Some I have seen, sixty or a hundred feet long and thirty feet broad….I have often lodged in their wigwams, and found them as warm as the best English houses.”

4. The Hogan

A hogan is the primary, traditional shelter of the Navajo people. It can be round, cone-shaped, multi-sided, or square; with or without internal posts; timber or stone walls and packed with earth in varying amounts or a bark roof for a summer house. Anything goes really.

The hogans of old are also considered pioneers of energy efficient homes: “Using packed mud against the entire wood structure, the home was kept cool by natural air ventilation and water sprinkled on the dirt ground inside. During the winter, the fireplace kept the inside warm for a long period of time and well into the night. This concept is called thermal mass.”

In 2001 the Hogan began seeing a revival with a joint-venture of a partnership involving the Navajo Nation, Northern Arizona University, the US Forest Service and other private and public partners.

5. The Burdei

The burdei dates back as far as 6000 years and it’s a type of half-dugout shelter somewhat between a sod house and a log cabin, usually with a floor that’s 1 – 1.5 meters under ground level.

This type of shelter is native to the Carpathian Mountains and forest steppes of eastern Europe but has seen use in North America as well by many of the earliest Ukrainian Canadian settlers as their first home in Canada at the end of the 19th century and by Mennonites from Imperial Russia who settled in the Hillsboro region of Kansas.

The March 20, 1875, issue of the national weekly newspaper Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper described the structures:

…is the quaint brand-new village of Gnadenau, where there are some twenty small farmers, who have built the queerest and most comfortable cheap houses ever seen in the West, and with the least amount of timber, being merely a skeleton roof built on the ground and thatched with prairie-grass. They serve for man and beast, being divided on the inside by a partition of adobe..

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7. The Barabara

A barabara were the traditional shelter used by the Alutiiq people and Aleuts, the indigenous people of the Aleutian Islands. Similar to the Burdei, the barabara lay partially underground like an earth lodge or pit-house so they could withstand the high forces of wind in the Aleutian chain of islands.

8. The Clochán

A Clochán is a dry-stone hut with a corbelled roof, commonly associated with the south-western Irish seaboard. Dry-stone is a building method where you use stones without any mortar to bind them together, and these structures get their strength from compressional forces and the interlocking of the stones.

Clocháns are most commonly round beehive huts and the walls are very thick, up to 1.5 metres. Some Clocháns are not completely built of stone, and may have had a thatched roof.

9. The Log Cabin

Some of the first log structures were built in Northern Europe many thousands of years ago, and they’re most commonly associated with Scandinavia and Eastern Europe.

They’re built out of logs laid on top of each other horizontally, with notches at both ends to form weather tight corners. The thick solid wood provide much better insulation over a timber frame covered with skins, boards, or shingles.

With suitable tools and logs, a log cabin can be erected (and disassembled) from scratch in days by a family but it can stand for potentially hundreds of years. In fact, not far from where I live you’ll find one of Sweden’s best preserved old farms with log structures built in the 1700’s that’s still in good condition.

Just as with the Clochán, the log cabin gets its structural integrity from compressional forces, and a log cabin tends to slightly compress as it settles over a few months or years.

10. The Long House

Longhouses have been built all over Europe, Asia and the Americas, but may be most commonly associated with the Iroquois tribes in North America, as well as with the Norse (better known as the Vikings) in Scandinavia.

They are built similarly to wigwams, with pole frames and bark covering. The main difference is that longhouses are much, much larger. Longhouses could be 200 feet long, 20 feet wide, and 20 feet high.

Smaller longhouses housed one or several multi-generational families while larger ones could house an entire clan– as many as 60 people!

11. The Bamboo House

 

Tahitian bamboo house, c. 1902

Not a house design but rather an excellent building material, bamboo has a high strength-to-weight ratio useful for structures. It grows fast, it’s light-weight, and is a sustainable source of building material.

In its natural form, bamboo as a construction material is traditionally associated with the cultures of South Asia, East Asia and the South Pacific, to some extent in Central and South America,

12. The Pueblo

Pueblos are adobe house complexes used by the Pueblo Indians of the Southwest. They’re modular, multi-story houses made of adobe (clay and straw baked into hard bricks) or of large stones cemented together with adobe.

A whole pueblo housing comples can house an entire clan, with each adobe unit being home to one family much like a modern apartment. These houses can last for dozens of generations or longer in a warm, dry climate.

13. The Earthen House

Turf house in Sænautasel, Iceland.

In the old days you’d find several types of earthen houses around the world, including Native American houses such as the Navajo hogans, Sioux earth lodges, pit houses of the West Coast and Plateau, as well as subarctic sod houses in Alaska, Canada and on Iceland in the Atlantic.

These are all semi-subterranean houses, sheltered by the surrounding earth on three or four sides with a roof on top. The main benefit of the earthen house is that you’re sheltered from both cold and wind by the earth, and if you face large windows towards the south you can potentially heat your home 100% passively from the sun.

14. The Igloo

Igloos are snow houses used by the Inuit (Eskimos) of northern Canada. Igloos are dome-shaped shelters built from the snow, with large blocks of ice set in a spiral pattern and packed with snow to form the dome.

You’d be surprised how warm an igloo can get when it’s freezing outside! “On the outside, temperatures may be as low as −45 °C (−49 °F), but on the inside the temperature may range from −7 °C (19 °F) to 16 °C (61 °F) when warmed by body heat alone.” – Cornell University, 2003

15. The Yurt

The yurt is a portable shelter used by nomads in the steppes of Central Asia for at least three thousand years. You read that correctly. 3000 years. Wow.

Traditional yurts consist of an expanding wooden circular frame carrying a felt cover, and complete construction takes as little as 2 hours.

15. The Walipini

Not as ancient as the other shelters on this list, the walipini is still worth a mention because it’s such a simple yet brilliant idea, and it can be built for as little as $300.

A walipini is an underground greenhouse that lets you grow food year-round, and the idea was first developed in Bolivia, South America. It uses the same earth sheltering principles as many of the ancient house designs on this list.

What makes the walipini better than hoop houses and green houses? First, by locating the growing area 6’- 8’ underground you take advantage of the constant temperature of the earth below the frost level. Second, you can capture and store the daytime solar radiation in the surrounding earth which then radiates back into the greenhouse during the cold winter nights.

What Can We Learn?

You might not want to move into a tipi any time soon, but there are still a lot to learn from our ancestors.

These ancient house designs are better than modern homes in many aspects because they were adapted specifically for their environments. The homes in the Arizona desert looked much different from the homes in the Alaskan tundra, and nomadic people had different needs than agricultural people.

The point is that our ancestors were as One with their environments and co-existed with Nature. These people were native to the land, while modern man is more like an invasive species that does not know its place in Nature.

But, maybe most of all, these homes illustrate that the builders knew when enough was enough. They were clear about the purpose of building a home, i.e. to stay protected from the elements and have a safe place to sleep, rather than constantly expending their life energy on trying to build bigger and fancier homes.

Here’s a closing thought from Henry David Thoreau:

It is possible to invent a house still more convenient and luxurious than we have, which yet all would admit that man could not afford to pay for. Shall we always study to obtain more of these things, and not sometimes to be content with less? Shall the respectable citizen thus gravely teach, by precept and example, the necessity of the young man’s providing a certain number of superfluous glow-shoes, umbrellas, and empty guest champers for empty guests, before he dies? Why should not our furniture be as simple as the Arab’s or the Indian’s?

Why indeed?